12 Minute Long MarsQuake

#1
My Marsquake Questions:

1. Anyone besides me find it odd for Mars to feature a 12 minute long single Marsquake quakeform event? Not a quake with aftershocks, mind you - but a single Marsquake lasting 12 minutes of one single wav form in duration and disciplined arrival distribution?​
2. And why would a Mars quake arrive in a disciplined Poisson arrival distribution function and not a chaotic positive skewed Beta arrival distribution like all other Earthquakes we have ever measured? This makes no sense at all. Do Mars quakes adhere to single factor integral calculus?​
3. Anyone besides me find it odd for Mars to have a quake which registered only in high frequencies above 10 Hz? I suppose a distant tremor moving through the right materials could serve to filter/refract the otherwise broadband frequencies in this manner.​
4. And why would a frequency spectrogram for Mars quakes, be truncated at 10 Hz at the top? Especially if we are LOOKING for far away, high frequency signatures to begin with. That is like attempting to spot fir trees using a scope which only sees in one narrow colorband of dark red. The trees are friggin light green, why not look in that color band? We don't do that with Earthquake wave spectrograms.​

Not that there is any conspiracy or Tremors-style Kevin Bacon aliens here, just that I find these four factors all rather odd. Perhaps a professional who has spent ample time examining distant Earthquake wave form signatures can explain this set of phenomena.

 
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#2
So I went ahead and did a comparative graphic showing the problem here.

My supposition that higher frequencies would indicate a quake which was farther away, was incorrect. High frequencies coming through the ground indicate an origin nearer, rather than farther away. This only serves to exacerbate the problem here. The US Geological Survey guidance on that issue is quoted in this graphic.

Mars and Earthquakes Compared.png
 
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#3
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=7383


...
The new seismic event was too small to provide solid data on the Martian interior, which is one of InSight's main objectives. The Martian surface is extremely quiet, allowing SEIS, InSight's specially designed seismometer, to pick up faint rumbles. In contrast, Earth's surface is quivering constantly from seismic noise created by oceans and weather. An event of this size in Southern California would be lost among dozens of tiny crackles that occur every day.

"The Martian Sol 128 event is exciting because its size and longer duration fit the profile of moonquakes detected on the lunar surface during the Apollo missions," said Lori Glaze, Planetary Science Division director at NASA Headquarters.

...
Mars and the Moon do not have tectonic plates, but they still experience quakes - in their cases, caused by a continual process of cooling and contraction that creates stress. This stress builds over time, until it is strong enough to break the crust, causing a quake.
 
#4
"The Martian Sol 128 event is exciting because its size and longer duration fit the profile of moonquakes detected on the lunar surface during the Apollo missions," said Lori Glaze, Planetary Science Division director at NASA Headquarters.

Mars and the Moon do not have tectonic plates, but they still experience quakes - in their cases, caused by a continual process of cooling and contraction that creates stress. This stress builds over time, until it is strong enough to break the crust, causing a quake.
"Furthermore, shallow moonquakes lasted a remarkably long time. Once they got going, all continued more than 10 minutes. "The moon was ringing like a bell," [Clive R.] Neal says."

The duration is compared to the duration of the Apollo measured Moon quakes - good, that helps, ;;/? However, this is only one similarity among the four oddities. The Division Director saying 'its size...(apart from 'longer duration') fits the profile of moonquakes detected' is not a truthful statement. We do not know the 'size' of the noise which caused this wave form. So, Lori Glaze was rushing to stuff this into a bucket prematurely, going where the scientists were not ready to go just yet... to wit,

InSight Team: "Scientists still are examining the data to determine the exact cause of the signal."

The 1,000 moonquakes recorded from 1972 to 1977 were rather pronounced - but they were in a critical daisy chain series, which lasted 10 minutes as a group - not as one single wave form, as was this Mars quake. Nor do we have the Moonquakes' spectrograms. The reason for this daisy chain 'bell ringing' effect is the extreme of tidal gravity imparted by the nearby Earth (Moon crust has two vectors (Ge and Gm) of gravity, and not one), and the extremes of hot to cold involved in each Moon Day. Mars faces none of this.

My suspicion is that this is possibly a Mars dust devil which passed moderately nearby (the article says that this is our fourth occurrence actually). That is the only thing I can think of which would last this long and be emanated by one single noise source (one wave form). There are just no low frequencies in this signal - and moving ground always acts as the lowest frequency tympani in the symphony. As you move away from the source, you lose the higher frequencies. In this Mars quake case, we did not lose the higher frequencies - we lost the lower ones. The exact opposite of what a quake should show.

I'm glad the scientists at the InSight team are holding off on jumping to conclusion with this.
 
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