Mod+ 250. DR. JEFFREY SCHWARTZ, SCIENCE’S INABILITY TO EXPLAIN PERSONHOOD

Discussion in 'Skeptiko Shows' started by alex.tsakiris, Jul 29, 2014.

  1. Dmitch

    Dmitch New

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    Belief can also occur as an artifact of experience
     
  2. David Eire

    David Eire New

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  3. http://umdberg.pbworks.com/f/Alberts-Cell-1998.pdf

    Cell, Vol. 92, 291–294, February 6, 1998

    The Cell as a Collection Overview of Protein Machines
    ...
    Bruce Alberts
    President, National Academy of Sciences
    ...
    We have always underestimated cells. Undoubtedly we still do today. But at least we are no longer as naive as we were when I was a graduate student in the 1960s. Then, most of us viewed cells as containing a giant set of second-order reactions: molecules A and B were thought to diffuse freely, randomly colliding with each other to produce molecule AB—and likewise for the many other molecules that interact with each other inside a cell. This seemed reasonable because, as we had learned from studying physical chemistry, motions at the scale of molecules are incredibly rapid.

    But, as it turns out, we can walk and we can talk because the chemistry that makes life possible is much more elaborate and sophisticated than anything we students had ever considered. Proteins make up most of the dry mass of a cell. But instead of a cell dominated by randomly colliding individual protein molecules, we now know that nearly every major process in a cell is carried out by assemblies of 10 or more protein molecules. And, as it carries out its biological functions, each of these protein assemblies interacts with several other large complexes of proteins. Indeed, the entire cell can be viewed as a factory that contains an elaborate network of interlocking assembly lines, each of which is composed of a set of large protein machines.​
     
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