Brain activity during cardiac arrest

#1
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-03-brain-cardiac.html

All over the world, researchers are trying to solve an age-old mystery: What happens in the brain when the heart stops? With the support of the Austrian Science Fund FWF, medical experts from Vienna are participating in an international study that looks into memory processes during cardiac arrest.
Doesn't really tell anything new. Looks like this is related to the ongoing AWARE study.
 
#2
The study where mice have a burst of eeg activity just before they die is the latest "Tom & Jerry" show by the materialists. Unfortunately, if everyone does have this burst of activity before they die, we would likely have more NDEs (or some other kind of hallucinations) reported than not - if the random bursts were the cause. NDEs are relatively infrequent.

My Best,
Bertha
 
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#3
The study where mice have a burst of eeg activity just before they die is the latest "Tom & Jerry" show by the materialists. Unfortunately, if everyone does have this burst of activity before they die, we would likely have more NDEs (or some other kind of hallucinations) reported than not. NDEs are relatively infrequent.

My Best,
Bertha
Not just this, but the only burst of electrical activity occurred within the first 30 seconds of death. Even if this applied to people, and even if you could prove the mouse had consciousness and a near death experience to boot, it by its own definitions fails to explain an observation, such as the one in the Aware study, which was documented to have occurred much, much later than the 30 seconds recorded by the mouse study.
 
#5
The study where mice have a burst of eeg activity just before they die is the latest "Tom & Jerry" show by the materialists. Unfortunately, if everyone does have this burst of activity before they die, we would likely have more NDEs (or some other kind of hallucinations) reported than not - if the random bursts were the cause. NDEs are relatively infrequent.

My Best,
Bertha
I think this study shows that animals are like us in this respect - and indeed they seem to be conscious beings essentially like us. I'll bet that animals have NDE's too.

My hunch is that everyone who loses the functionality of their brain for long enough has an NDE, but that many either forget the experience, or choose not to discuss it. Remember that we seem to have an efficient forgetting mechanism in the brain, which means that most dreams slip away within seconds of waking up - even if we try to retain them. Something similar may happen in the case of NDE's.

In a way, this study corroborates the human reports of NDE's.

David
 
#6
In a way, this study corroborates the human reports of NDE's.
I don't think so. There are (at least) two obvious problems in trying to relate the rat study to humans. The first is that we have no idea what the rats experienced, if anything. The second is that we don't know that human NDEs are correlated with this burst of activity. Certainly the recent case from the AWARE study where a man had awareness during a prolonged period (timed by the automated announcement from the medical equipment) would point to something other than the burst measured in the rat experiment.

More information:
Spikes in EEG at time of death
AWARE Study results 2014
 
#7
...the recent case from the AWARE study where a man had awareness during a prolonged period (timed by the automated announcement from the medical equipment) would point to something other than the burst measured in the rat experiment...
Why's that?
 
#8
The rat study specifically stated that the increased electrical activity in the brain only occurred within the first 30 seconds after death. Since the one incident in the aware study occurred well after that 30 second time frame then the rat study, even if it applied to humans which hasn't been documented, can't explain the incident in the aware study.
 
#9
The rat study specifically stated that the increased electrical activity in the brain only occurred within the first 30 seconds after death. Since the one incident in the aware study occurred well after that 30 second time frame then the rat study, even if it applied to humans which hasn't been documented, can't explain the incident in the aware study.
1)
AWARE = AWAreness during REsuscitation.

2) In Borjigin's study there was no attempt to resuscitate the rats.

3) There is a reason people use the first aid technique of Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), because it's been shown that it can extend the period before major cell damage occurs, thus it must reverse (to some extent) the lack of energy available to the brain's cells, thus extending the period within which activity (like that measured by Borjigin) can occur. The same must apply to resuscitation.

4) I find it somewhat frustrating to read members posts on Skeptiko constantly regurgitating a phrase similar to '...surge in activity...' as a method of quickly dismissing the results of Borjigin's unique study... without engaging with the detail that lies behind the phrase. I've absolutely no reason to dispute what Borjigin's team found...



The crucial point is that they claim that EM field measurements of 9 rats brains approx 20 seconds into cardiac arrest, suddenly resembled the EM field measurements of the brains of wakeful humans undertaking a visual task.

At time 0-20 seconds into cardiac arrest the rats brains EM field measurements became chaotic, but as the rats endogenous EM field collapsed, the rats EM field became temporarily synchronized again at 20 sec, and it resembled the EM field of a wakeful human undertaking a visual task.

That's what needs explaining.

- AFAIK Electrons are strongly affected by the magnetic component of EM fields.
- Borjigin only put the rats into a Faraday cage.
- Faraday cages don't block slowly varying magnetic fields.
 
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