Experience without brain function

#1
It recently occurred to me how presuppositions decide how evidence is interpreted. We are told by materialists that the brain generates consciousness. All the evidence supposedly confirms this. Remove one part of the brain, and the corresponding function disappears. Or does it?

Cortical blindness is interesting. The visual cortex no longer functions, and therefore the patient has to be blind. There should be no visual experience whatsoever. Not even in dreams. However...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anton–Babinski_syndrome

Instead of taking the patient's word that he is having actual visual experiences, it is classified as a delusion from the outset. For some strange inexplicable reason, he thinks he is seeing a world of color and visual sensations, when he isn't, because he can't, because materialism is true.
 
#2
It recently occurred to me how presuppositions decide how evidence is interpreted. We are told by materialists that the brain generates consciousness. All the evidence supposedly confirms this. Remove one part of the brain, and the corresponding function disappears. Or does it?

Cortical blindness is interesting. The visual cortex no longer functions, and therefore the patient has to be blind. There should be no visual experience whatsoever. Not even in dreams. However...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anton–Babinski_syndrome

Instead of taking the patient's word that he is having actual visual experiences, it is classified as a delusion from the outset. For some strange inexplicable reason, he thinks he is seeing a world of color and visual sensations, when he isn't, because he can't, because materialism is true.
Yes, I have witnessed this in my practice as an OT. The person in question was suffering from what Neurologists diagnosed as Crutchfield-Jacobs Disease. When questioned, the patient insisted she could see, but was plainly blind. The patient also suffered from a rapidly progressive Dementia. It's more likely, some form of dysfunctional information processing is occurring when a brain is affected by Cortical Blindness, but the person claims they can still see. That a person should still have sighted dreams after Cortical Blindness is expected. Maybe I'm misunderstanding your point.
A more cogent example of what your attempting to explain would be blind from birth NDEs, where a visual experience is recorded. http://www.near-death.com/experiences/evidence03.html
 
#3
That a person should still have sighted dreams after Cortical Blindness is expected
Really? If you have a stroke that paralyzes your right arm, you cannot move it, even in imagination or in dreams. The same parts of the brain that operate when you are visually perceiving something during the waking status, are also used when you dream. Hence, you ought to remain completely and utterly blind as long as the visual cortex doesn't work. Either these people are having some delusion which leads them to believe they have visual (or auditory) experiences when the part of the brain that is believed to generate it, has stopped functioning. Or they are actually having visual experiences, which suggest they can have them without the brain doing it. The latter is discarded because of a pre-commitment to materialism. I see no reason not to take these people at their word when they say they have visual experience. Not all of them are demented.
 
#4
A more cogent example of what your attempting to explain would be blind from birth NDEs, where a visual experience is recorded. http://www.near-death.com/experiences/evidence03.html
This is interesting. The strange thing is, and correct me if I'm wrong, but if a person with congenital blindness becomes sighted at some point during life, (s)he wouldn't even be able to distinguish between "separate" objects, much less be able to decipher between nurses and doctors in an ER, for example. That NDE anomaly is almost more fascinating than acquiring the ability of sight itself.
 
#5
This is interesting. The strange thing is, and correct me if I'm wrong, but if a person with congenital blindness becomes sighted at some point during life, (s)he wouldn't even be able to distinguish between "separate" objects, much less be able to decipher between nurses and doctors in an ER, for example. That NDE anomaly is almost more fascinating than acquiring the ability of sight itself.
If memory serves me well and it often doesn't. That's why I always check answers on Google. The developing brain requires the visual cortex to function properly in early stages in order for it to develop the ability to interpret the electrical signals it receives. When a disease process or injury denies denies proper development in the infant stage. It can never acquire, even with therapy and training a normal pathway to properly interpret images entering the eyes, even if the visual cortex becomes functional again. In essence, the eyes can see but the brain stays blind. I imagine it would vary from person to person, as to what visual information they may receive. However, there is such a thing as blindsight (I don't know if it applies to blind from birth) ( the example given is with Hemianopsia, blind in same quadrants). That is some other part of the brain is receiving visual information not conscious to the receiver. That person may appear to be quessing whether an object is nearby, but studies have shown correct guesses are well above chance. Yor may perceive this as proof of some non- brain quality, but I think it's well within the capabilities of the brain. As to Yor's contention about inability to dream sight or movement after a stroke or cortical blindness. It's a mistaken assertion. If one holds memories of normal vision or movement then one can access those memories in dreams. That's why I believe I'm still misunderstanding Yor's point. Its nonsensical (a pun)?
 
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