Hellish NDEs

#1
Hello everyone,

I'm recording a series of interviews on Hell and hellish experiences. So far I've had Anglican priest Simon Small on, as well as NDE'er Angie Fenimore. Angie went to 'the edge of Hell' after a suicide attempt before being rescued by Jesus. The experience was totally transformative for her.

I'm looking to produce something practical addressing Hadephobia – the fear of Hell. I have a Tibetan Buddhist and a psychotherapist lined up to come on, I'm also attempting to get someone who has had a fundamentalist Christian Hell experience.


If anyone has any thoughts I'd be glad to hear them...
 
#3
Okay hopefully I have Bryan W Melvin coming on, author of A Land Unknown. Very similar experience to Bill Weise I think.


What interests me is that the message Bryan says he got from the NDE, it wasn't an 'It's all about love it doesn't matter what religion you are' message; it was a 'believe in Jesus or else' message. What does that say about the nature of NDEs?

It certainly transformed Byran's life, he went from atheist to preacher.

I'll post some of my ideas but would love to know what questions other people would ask...
 
#4
It seems unlikely that this was actually the message of his NDE. Perhaps his frightened mind portrayed it as such, but let's pick this apart and see how much sense this makes: Assuming what he says is true, God is cruel and vindictive and forces people to worship him or will otherwise burn in eternal damnation forever. What sense does this make? What about people who have never heard of the Hebrew God? Why would he do something as silly as allowing them to burn in Hell, simply because they have no knowledge of him? What sense does that make? Furthermore, an all-loving God cannot by its very nature simply allow people to burn in Hell because they don't believe in him. It would be like getting punished for not believing in the Easter Bunny. It's silly. Getting burned in Hell does not at all seem like the actions of a loving God (if indeed such a thing exists).

If you ask me, religion is a fear tactic used by the establishment to divide the masses. We should do well to avoid it, but to acknowledge the spiritual aspect of our existence that can be seen through mystical and NDEs.
 
#5
It seems unlikely that this was actually the message of his NDE. Perhaps his frightened mind portrayed it as such, but let's pick this apart and see how much sense this makes: Assuming what he says is true, God is cruel and vindictive and forces people to worship him or will otherwise burn in eternal damnation forever. What sense does this make? What about people who have never heard of the Hebrew God? Why would he do something as silly as allowing them to burn in Hell, simply because they have no knowledge of him? What sense does that make? Furthermore, an all-loving God cannot by its very nature simply allow people to burn in Hell because they don't believe in him. It would be like getting punished for not believing in the Easter Bunny. It's silly. Getting burned in Hell does not at all seem like the actions of a loving God (if indeed such a thing exists).

If you ask me, religion is a fear tactic used by the establishment to divide the masses. We should do well to avoid it, but to acknowledge the spiritual aspect of our existence that can be seen through mystical and NDEs.
Two lines of questioning I plan on going down are -

Do you see a possibility for a distinction between the experience itself and your interpretation of it? Could it have been symbolic in some way?

And...

How do you cope psychologically with holding such beliefs? Surely a belief in a God like that would lead many to depression and despair.
 
#6
To answer your question, I believe more than likely that what his experience was likely symbolic in some way, as this does not fit the template of most reported NDEs.

As for how someone could cope psychologically: it's simple. Religion has appeal because it gives people something to belong to and also gives there lives meaning, but it also has a more insidious factor in which it more often than not leads to us vs them mentality and people use it to justify all kinds of monstrosities. After all, if you are the only right God, all other beliefs become unacceptable. If a being is omnipotent, it cannot be wrong, so, therefore, unbelievers deserve everything they get with this logic.

As far as how someone would cope: some people see it as something they have to do, just like you have to pay taxes. If you don't pay taxes, you will go to jail. In another token, if you don't worship the Hebrew God, you will burn forever in the pit of Hell. This is the logic of some people. They don't see it as a choice they have.
 
#7
Hello everyone,

I'm recording a series of interviews on Hell and hellish experiences. So far I've had Anglican priest Simon Small on, as well as NDE'er Angie Fenimore. Angie went to 'the edge of Hell' after a suicide attempt before being rescued by Jesus. The experience was totally transformative for her.

I'm looking to produce something practical addressing Hadephobia – the fear of Hell. I have a Tibetan Buddhist and a psychotherapist lined up to come on, I'm also attempting to get someone who has had a fundamentalist Christian Hell experience.


If anyone has any thoughts I'd be glad to hear them...
well this is great please keep us posted. We got to find a way to work this into future episodes
 
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