Help! Need ideas

#1
I recently had a yearly “summit” with a couple of good friends. I thought this was the perfect opportunity to discuss and debate paranormal experiences. Well, they had had none (paranormal experiences) and were, understandably, frighted of the thought their worldview may be challenge.

I sent one of my friends Jeff Kripal’s “Secret Body” as I know he’ll read it and we can fully engage next time we meet. The other participant “my brother” is more entrenched in the “standard model”, if you will, of reality and has no understanding of paranormal experiences such as NDEs, out of body experiences and so forth. What I’m asking for is some ideas of books, videos or podcast that might gently open him up to the paranormal so when we meet again, we can have a rich experience debating this. I’m considering Kripal’s “The Supernatural" and Roger Welsch’s “Reluctant Pilgrim” but my intuition tells me to look for something else. What do you think? What’s the best way to bring him into the paranormal conversation?
Thanks,

Red Elrond
 
#2
I recently had a yearly “summit” with a couple of good friends. I thought this was the perfect opportunity to discuss and debate paranormal experiences. Well, they had had none (paranormal experiences) and were, understandably, frighted of the thought their worldview may be challenge.

I sent one of my friends Jeff Kripal’s “Secret Body” as I know he’ll read it and we can fully engage next time we meet. The other participant “my brother” is more entrenched in the “standard model”, if you will, of reality and has no understanding of paranormal experiences such as NDEs, out of body experiences and so forth. What I’m asking for is some ideas of books, videos or podcast that might gently open him up to the paranormal so when we meet again, we can have a rich experience debating this. I’m considering Kripal’s “The Supernatural" and Roger Welsch’s “Reluctant Pilgrim” but my intuition tells me to look for something else. What do you think? What’s the best way to bring him into the paranormal conversation?
Thanks,

Red Elrond

You've explained your beliefs, unless they ask for more information I don't think you need to do more. If they are "entrenched" it will be almost impossible to change their minds. People use logic more to defend their beliefs than to form them. It is human nature to demand iron clad proof for an alternative view, while accepting any tenuous hypothesis to maintain their belief in the face of contradictory evidence. It is very hard to win a debate against that double standard.

Some people are here to experience being a materialist. Why risk messing up their incarnation?

Here are some on-line sources of more information. The first two links are books, the second two links are pages on my web site.

A Lawyer Presents the Case for the Afterlife
http://www.victorzammit.com/book/4thedition/index.html

Your Eternal Self
http://www.ebook.youreternalself.com/chapter1textlink.htm

Nobel Prize winning scientists and other great scientist had paranormal beliefs because of scientific evidence. (This information is helpful in demonstrating that belief in the paranormal is reasonable.)
https://sites.google.com/site/chs4o8pt/eminent_researchers

Evidence of the afterlife.
https://sites.google.com/site/chs4o8pt/summary_of_evidence
 
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#3
I think it depends whether they are entrenched in scientific materialism - as opposed to general purpose scepticism.

If they are scientific types, I think Dean Radin's "Entangled minds" is a good book. Most of what he discusses are 'boring' experiments, in the sense that nobody meets his dead relations, or whatever, but that may be the way to start teasing them away from materialism.

You would have to warn them, however, that if they looked the books up on the internet they will have attracted debunkers.

If either of them is interested in neuroscience, this book might attract them:

https://www.amazon.com/Suddenly-Psy.../ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

The author was a neuroscientist and almost by chance visited the Monroe Institute for an introductory course....

David
 
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#4
You've explained your beliefs, unless they ask for more information I don't think you need to do more. If they are "entrenched" it will be almost impossible to change their minds. People use logic more to defend their beliefs than to form them. It is human nature to demand iron clad proof for an alternative view, while accepting any tenuous hypothesis to maintain their belief in the face of contradictory evidence. It is very hard to win a debate against that double standard.

Some people are here to experience being a materialist. Why risk messing up their incarnation?

Here are some on-line sources of more information. The first two links are books, the second two links are pages on my web site.

A Lawyer Presents the Case for the Afterlife
http://www.victorzammit.com/book/4thedition/index.html

Your Eternal Self
http://www.ebook.youreternalself.com/chapter1textlink.htm

Nobel Prize winning scientists and other great scientist had paranormal beliefs because of scientific evidence. (This information is helpful in demonstrating that belief in the paranormal is reasonable.)
https://sites.google.com/site/chs4o8pt/eminent_researchers

Evidence of the afterlife.
https://sites.google.com/site/chs4o8pt/summary_of_evidence
Thanks!
 
#5
I recently had a yearly “summit” with a couple of good friends. I thought this was the perfect opportunity to discuss and debate paranormal experiences. Well, they had had none (paranormal experiences) and were, understandably, frighted of the thought their worldview may be challenge.

I sent one of my friends Jeff Kripal’s “Secret Body” as I know he’ll read it and we can fully engage next time we meet. The other participant “my brother” is more entrenched in the “standard model”, if you will, of reality and has no understanding of paranormal experiences such as NDEs, out of body experiences and so forth. What I’m asking for is some ideas of books, videos or podcast that might gently open him up to the paranormal so when we meet again, we can have a rich experience debating this. I’m considering Kripal’s “The Supernatural" and Roger Welsch’s “Reluctant Pilgrim” but my intuition tells me to look for something else. What do you think? What’s the best way to bring him into the paranormal conversation?
Thanks,

Red Elrond
**
Have him listen to some old Art Bell shows... at night, in the dark... alone.
 
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