Illustrated dream diary

#1
As some of you know, I've kept a dream journal up to date since late 1989. Today, there are more than 13,000 dreams recorded in it. I also make quite a lot of illustrations in the journal to record information that takes less time to draw than to describe in words, or that is a better representation of whatever it is I am trying to record. When I started the journal and for long afterward, I would make drawings as soon as I woke or not at all. The reason is that, although in many cases I retain a clear visual memory of dream content to the present day, I was originally thinking of my dream records as evidence. I did not want to confuse any readers by creating illustrations ex post facto, even if I felt I hadn't had the time to do it properly at the time the dream was recorded.

Around 2010 or 2011, a researcher asked me if I had made any drawings for a specific dream she wanted to write about. I hadn't. She asked if I could make one, to help visualize the dream for her. At first I said no but then realized that if the illustration was dated with the current date as an illustration of a dream that was also dated, then it wouldn't be confusing at all. It would be like a second edition of a book that is clearly labeled as such. With that understanding, I made the illustration.

Thinking about it later, I realized there were many dreams that couldn't possibly be used for evidence because their content was spiritual, with no connection to waking physical reality. Many of these contained interesting subject matter for illustrations. I decided then to go ahead and illustrate the spiritual dreams on the basis that, 1) they couldn't be used as evidence of precognition or other psi because they contained no references to waking reality, and 2) as long as I gave the dream date and the date of the illustration, the documentation would be clear.

With the foregoing in mind, I have since made over two hundred illustrations based on my more spiritual dream content. I thought readers here might enjoy some of these, so I'll post some here.
 

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#2
As some of you know, I've kept a dream journal up to date since late 1989. Today, there are more than 13,000 dreams recorded in it. I also make quite a lot of illustrations in the journal to record information that takes less time to draw than to describe in words, or that is a better representation of whatever it is I am trying to record. When I started the journal and for long afterward, I would make drawings as soon as I woke or not at all. The reason is that, although in many cases I retain a clear visual memory of dream content to the present day, I was originally thinking of my dream records as evidence. I did not want to confuse any readers by creating illustrations ex post facto, even if I felt I hadn't had the time to do it properly at the time the dream was recorded.

Around 2010 or 2011, a researcher asked me if I had made any drawings for a specific dream she wanted to write about. I hadn't. She asked if I could make one, to help visualize the dream for her. At first I said no but then realized that if the illustration was dated with the current date as an illustration of a dream that was also dated, then it wouldn't be confusing at all. It would be like a second edition of a book that is clearly labeled as such. With that understanding, I made the illustration.

Thinking about it later, I realized there were many dreams that couldn't possibly be used for evidence because their content was spiritual, with no connection to waking physical reality. Many of these contained interesting subject matter for illustrations. I decided then to go ahead and illustrate the spiritual dreams on the basis that, 1) they couldn't be used as evidence of precognition or other psi because they contained no references to waking reality, and 2) as long as I gave the dream date and the date of the illustration, the documentation would be clear.

With the foregoing in mind, I have since made over two hundred illustrations based on my more spiritual dream content. I thought readers here might enjoy some of these, so I'll post some here.
These are amazing. I'd love to see them all to be honest. How do you do these? I usually lose my dreams as soon as I start moving around.
 
#3
At first, I drew them with whatever pen I used to record the dream. As time went on, I put more effort into the drawings. At first they were little more than schematics but now they are fairly finished roughs, or "comps". I've made one finished oil painting based on a dream, then a CG rendering of the same dream because I wasn't happy with how the painting came out. As my drawings got more complicated, my daughter encouraged me to make more refined drawings, so I did. Eventually I was spending quite a bit of time on them. At first, a sketch in the journal was a matter of a minute or less but now, I have spent many days drawing an entire sequence from a dream. Attached are the first ten of thirteen such images. In my next post, I'll post the last three, to get around the ten image limit.
 

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#5
Thanks Andy. Interesting to see how they are different from what I imagined from your book.

Would be interesting to know what dreams you have had since your book. You should write a sequel! But, of course, books are hard work. I have been meaning to write my own for years and not done it. Is your New York City abandoned dream in your book? I don't remember it. All kinds of things about New York City around. Tsunami dreams especially on YouTube but also the idea of another 9/11. I am wondering about that especially. Have you watched "BACK TO THE FUTURE predicts 9/11" on the barelyhuman11 channel on YouTube? Quite important I think. I have a number of weird connections to that film. Thanks again Andy.
 
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