Is Parapsychology supportive of Religion?

#41
It seems there's this argument that if paranormal stuff is real then it would make people more likely to believe in extant religions.

Is that true though? I mean look at the recent X-men Apocalypse trailer where it suggests a mutant (so human with paranormal powers) was responsible for Hinduism, Egypt's ancient faith, and the Abrahamic faiths ->


So it's entirely possible religious figures had some kind of Psi powers that got exaggerated. In fact the messiness of the paranormal/spiritual worlds suggest to me there would be multiple entities using religion for benevolent and malevolent ends.

Look at reincarnation - the idea that there is some kind of karmic system seems to go against what's actually observed.

NDEs - okay this might be the one place where you could make an argument that some percentage of people meet religious figures and get shown Heaven (and sometimes Hell)...but it seems a good deal of NDEs don't involve traditional religious notions like eternal damnation.

Channeling - it seems the major message of channeling seems to be we are practically gods ourselves, choosing to incarnate and even choose our fates in the mortal lifetimes we experiences.

Alien encounters - Looking at Vallee's stuff, seems like either there are beings masquerading as gods our we are gods trying to remember our own divinity.
I see evidence for the existence of parapsychological phenomena as broadly propitious for religious belief, because-- to varying degrees and in varying ways-- it tends to confirm various fundamental premises of religious worldviews, and specifically premises which are often disputed by practitioners in other fields of science. Of course a great deal hangs on the *interpretation* of these phenomena, which is beyond the scope of scientific research and falls to philosophical and theological reasoning, personal spiritual intuition, and/or simple preference. Much of your post (along with subsequent ones in this thread, I see) is devoted to positing alternative (non-religious) interpretations of psi phenomena, but whether or not these are valid, they are conjectures which a religiously-inclined person may or may not accept. If we are investigating whether or not (insert religion) might be true, then in addition to examining its claims from a historical/philosophical/theological standpoint, we might ask whether there is any empirical evidence that the basic claims it makes (for example, that humans possess an immaterial soul) have any truth value; parapsychological evidence (for example, extrasensory perception and Near-Death Experiences), if sound, can substantively corroborate some such claims.

Since (as debunkers are wont to remind us) we do not have a full explanation or "mechanism" for psi, your continual refrain that parapsychology may undermine religion by indicating people who manifest paranormal traits, experiences, or abilities are "like X-Men" and not "God-touched" lacks force to my mind. In much the same way that putting the term "spontaneous remission" (a placeholder term for recoveries which have not been explained in normal terms) on apparent cases of medical miracles does not actually meaningfully refute the claim that the event was miraculous, putting the term "psi" on seemingly-supernatural or divine phenomena does not meaningfully refute the claim that they are of a fundamental supernatural or divine character. I think an interpretation of the evidence whereby, as religions would have it, these phenomena are divine in origin and nature is very reasonable.
 
#43
Would love to hear more about this past life recall, if not here then in the Spirituality section of the forum.

Or did you already do so in a thread I missed? If so apologies.
Thanks for this suggestion or invitation for me to say more. A fairly brief response for now.

I think I've occasionally mentioned my story, perhaps in a private message, but never in any great detail, so no, you didn't miss anything so far.

There are several things which slow me down, One is the timespan involved (say from age five to twenty-two), and the feeling I have that to do the subject justice I'd need to put things into context, thus it tends to turn into an autobiography whenever I think of it.

Another is that it isn't a dry experiment in card-guessing, it's a story involving extremes of emotion from joy to misery which I don't mind relating but which can make an audience uncomfortable. Lastly, there's a question of verification against historical records, such as they are. To give even a superficial coverage of this aspect, could trigger others to double-check what I say, and I'm not sure I'm ready to have my life cross-examined in that way.

A lot for me to think about. But this is by no means my last word on the subject, I may come up with some sort of distilled summary to post maybe in another thread.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#44
I see evidence for the existence of parapsychological phenomena as broadly propitious for religious belief, because-- to varying degrees and in varying ways-- it tends to confirm various fundamental premises of religious worldviews, and specifically premises which are often disputed by practitioners in other fields of science. Of course a great deal hangs on the *interpretation* of these phenomena, which is beyond the scope of scientific research and falls to philosophical and theological reasoning, personal spiritual intuition, and/or simple preference.
Well it's not entirely clear that all the phenomena is beyond the scope of scientific research. There are a variety of proposals for explaining Psi even in a materialist paradigm.

Much of your post (along with subsequent ones in this thread, I see) is devoted to positing alternative (non-religious) interpretations of psi phenomena, but whether or not these are valid, they are conjectures which a religiously-inclined person may or may not accept.
Well a person can claim all the NDEs that contradict their faith are the work of demons, but with the general trend of global communication I'm not convinced this idea will hold water.

Note in a post to Typoz I did note that I was too hasty in the OP to assume parapsychology would be strongly counter religious.

If we are investigating whether or not (insert religion) might be true, then in addition to examining its claims from a historical/philosophical/theological standpoint, we might ask whether there is any empirical evidence that the basic claims it makes (for example, that humans possess an immaterial soul) have any truth value; parapsychological evidence (for example, extrasensory perception and Near-Death Experiences), if sound, can substantively corroborate some such claims.
Well I think everyone would be in agreement that parapsychology can make religion metaphysically plausible.

But establishing both reincarnation and NDEs contradicting scripture would hardly help shore up every religion since some either posit a karmic debt system or deny reincarnation. Others insist everyone goes to Heaven or Hell based on whether or not they believe in a particular God.

Since (as debunkers are wont to remind us) we do not have a full explanation or "mechanism" for psi, your continual refrain that parapsychology may undermine religion by indicating people who manifest paranormal traits, experiences, or abilities are "like X-Men" and not "God-touched" lacks force to my mind.
I think it's one thing if you read a story about Jesus or Krishna healing the sick, it's another when the guy capable of psychic healing read Bengson's book and is an average Joe.

As I said, it deflates the "miracle" of healing. Or at least it can do so in some minds.

In much the same way that putting the term "spontaneous remission" (a placeholder term for recoveries which have not been explained in normal terms) on apparent cases of medical miracles does not actually meaningfully refute the claim that the event was miraculous, putting the term "psi" on seemingly-supernatural or divine phenomena does not meaningfully refute the claim that they are of a fundamental supernatural or divine character. I think an interpretation of the evidence whereby, as religions would have it, these phenomena are divine in origin and nature is very reasonable.
Well saying something is of divine origin, and saying it supports a religion, are to my mind different things? I accept the fault is mine for going with the definition in my head and assuming everyone else would know what it was.

But I think spontaneous remission is different from psi in that Psi is often attributed to be a power held by a particular individual. Let's say Bengson's healing ideas took root and were effective. They're performed by atheists, Christians, Hindus, Jains, etc.

In your mind that doesn't deflate the idea that Krishna, Jesus, and so on were special persons?
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#45
An interesting argument linking parapsychology & religion by Grosso is his book - you should be able to read most it via Amazon's Look Inside feature.

See the final part.
http://www.amazon.com/Man-Who-Could-Fly-Levitation/dp/1442256729/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8
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Some podcasts with the folks at Esalen also discussing the topic:

Part 1

In this first part, we ask, why has the study of “paranormal” experience been somewhat ignored by academia in general and Religious Studies in particular? Is the problem the term “paranormal”? What importance of these kinds of studies have for the field? Is there concern that such studies necessarily seek to justify the ontological claims of the paranormal? This latter issue is pursued in part two, to be broadcast this wednesday. Many of the scholars also offer advice for those interested in this area but are worried about “employability”. You will hear, in the following order, the voices of Jeffery Kripal, Ann Taves, Tanya Luhrmann, Fiona Bowie, Paul Stoller, Charles Emmons, Stanley Krippner and David Hufford.



Part 2

In this second part we ask “the epistemic/ontological question”: in studying these experiences, how far should we be concerned with the ontology? Would to do so be an abandonment of the scientific materialism which underpins the discipline, and therefore a slide back into theology? Or can there be a bigger model of materialism – a “complicated materialism”, to use Ann Taves’ expression – in which these phenomena might be suitably explicable? Or, as Bowie puts it, can we use “empathetic engagement” to adopt the ontology for research purposes? You will hear, in the following order, the voices of Jeffery Kripal, Ann Taves, Tanya Luhrmann, Fiona Bowie, Paul Stoller, Charles Emmons and David Hufford.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#47
An interesting argument linking parapsychology & religion by Grosso is his book - you should be able to read most it via Amazon's Look Inside feature.

See the final part.
Why Levitation?

There are more basic questions that deal with the range of subjective human experience covered by the world of religion. Questions like, Is there a greater mind or spirit at large in the world? And if yes, can we interact with that greater mind? When I am sick or in danger or in need of guidance, am I all alone in a nonresponsive universe? Or are there some secret avenues of communication open to me in my hour of need or perplexity? Is death the end of my adventure on earth or does the story get picked up again on a different channel at a different wavelength? Are all my thoughts impotent echoes that sink into oblivion or are they as William Blake said “filling immensity”? Is all the mystery, every marvel and miracle in the history of the world part of a gigantic illusion? Questions like these touch more closely on what most people think and feel when they ruminate on these questions that center around religion. And questions like these are at least open to conversation in light of what we know about consciousness, psi, and even quantum mechanics. In my opinion, with the full panoply of extraordinary phenomena garnered from parapsychology and consciousness studies, it is possible to start a completely different kind of conversation about religion, spirituality, and the natural sciences.

A conversation of the sort I have in mind will not take place on a sufficiently large scale that is needed until two things happen: concessions, one from science and one from religion. Science needs to give up its blinkered attachment to an old-fashioned and stultifying reductive materialism. Religion has to renounce with a loving smile its pretensions to immutable and absolute truth; above all, it must lay aside its violent contention that one or another dogma must rule on pain of death.

To summarize this brief statement and answer the question: why levitation? First of all, however outrageous the notion, there is solid evidence for it, and the evidence should be confronted. Second, levitation is a rare and spectacular demonstration of a latent power that manifests in many different forms. What we call ‘psychokinesis’ — in its full potential – needs to be included in any complete account of the human personality. A third reason we should attend to the phenomenon of levitation is that it provides excellent fodder for discussion in the parapsychology of religion.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#48
Sci, in this thread, we see things differently, and I see things more like Jim. My answer to the thread title? "DEFINITELY". Let me explain why.

There are, in my view, two main reasons why people no longer believe in the extant religions. Firstly, they see them as contradictory, either internally or with respect to all of the other religions: why believe in a religion (Christianity) in which a supposedly all-powerful deity doesn't even destroy His most wicked opponent; why believe in one religion over another if the one is opposed to the other and a person has no objective means to distinguish between the two absolute claims? Parapsychology doesn't apply so much here. But: secondly, people see religions as rendered obsolete by "science" i.e. the materialist scientistic orthodoxy in which science has supposedly "proved" that anything spiritual or non-materialistic is mere myth and story-telling; that it is literally impossible.

It is here that parapsychology has (potentially) a huge impact. Parapsychology says: no, wait, that stuff's not impossible after all, and, in fact, science validates it rather than obsoleting it!

And once you re-open the door to "miracles" and "the supernatural", you re-open the door to religion that materialist scientism closed with its censure of the notion of all that which it deems "woo".

Now, you suggest, in effect - and I hope I am not taking liberties with this paraphrasing - that parapsychology can (should?) be interpreted as describing "natural" (as opposed to spiritual) powers to people. But, honestly, Sci, do you really think that this is how the average person is going to interpret it, especially in our modern culture? Give somebody evidence that they, or others, can see at a distance, or predict the future, or experience vivid events when their brain is utterly deprived of both oxygen and blood, and they are inevitably going to interpret it as evidence of something "beyond"; of something "spiritual"; and whilst that won't necessarily lead that person to an extant religion, it will certainly predispose them to it!

By the way, just a bit of a side note: your thread title mentioned merely "religion", whereas your actual OP referred to "extant" religions. I think that it is important to be clear on which you intend, because it makes a difference. It is very possible that "the" religion has not yet been revealed/constructed.
Sorry, missed this one!

The part you think parapsychology doesn't apply to - the contrast between religions - is actually the one I think that results in parapsychology having a disruptive effect on the extant religions. We have various post-mortem data points (NDEs, cases of reincarnation types, mediumship), and potential information on the larger non-material reality.

I think all of this information will, when viewed without bias, at least suggest that there are a variety of options for the post-mortem aspect of religion. Combine this with the reality of Psi - which can be seen as natural - as an explanation for miraculous powers and you have a recipe that really cuts into centralized religious authority...at least when talking about many extant religions though I suspect Spiritualism would be a strong potential exception.

Now that said I do agree that even the weakest fraction of Psi bolsters the possibility of religious claims being true, and as I noted in replies to others I was likely too swift to suggest parapsychology would invalidate religions. Also, I think you're probably right to note the contrast between religion in general - both past & future forms - and the extant religions.

What we might see are some kind of "meta" faiths or "salad bowl"/"melting pot" faiths born of the ideas of people like Jung & Steiner. I think you are correct that realizing that there is a vast number of possibilities - not all of them pleasant - that can occur after death, along with the knowledge that the world might be filled with unseen conscious entities would likely bring people toward some spiritual/esoteric practices at the very least.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#49
Follow up to the last post, a blog Psiclops recommended goes into the "Multidimensional Afterlife":

The Multidimensional Afterlife, Part I

There are many ways that spirits describe their environment to those who still inhabit the earth; and yet like humans, spirits are fallible, prone to disagreements and misstatements; their words can be mangled by mediums, distorted by channels, prone to bias from the human mind or simply misinterpreted due to the general perplexity in communication between our worlds. Hence, the adversities of the afterlife researcher, who struggles to piece together fragments and snippets of spirit communications, trying to avoid frauds and zealots, and find some sort of commonalities which can be used a basis to objectively describe a frustratingly subjective world. The good news is that with an ever expanding body of experiences and expanding access to information, a picture of the afterlife emerges. It’s far greater, more expansive and wondrous than we can imagine, but it also draws stark attention to the responsibility we have for our own thoughts, feelings and expectations.

Many people erroneously believe that once we cross over into this non-physical realm, that we become instantly enlightened, all-knowing, precognitive experts on the spirit realm. While it does seem that we gain a much wider, less egotistic perspective, I have never seen a reliable report of spirits claiming to know the ‘mind of God’ if you will, for the depth of their knowledge about the spirit world has much to do with their own evolution and perspective. If you are fortunate to come across a very highly-evolved spirit, for example Seth (as channeled by Jane Roberts), you may be privy to more information about the nature of consciousness, but even Seth admits his lack of knowledge in many areas.
The Multidimensional Afterlife, Part II

In The Multidimensional Afterlife, Part I, we were introduced to the afterlife as a hierarchy of thought-manifested worlds. Because the spirit realm is thought-based, souls are automatically attracted to the dimension that corresponds with their beliefs, expectations, personality and state of mind, as well as their spiritual development. When spirits cross over into the afterlife with strong expectations, religious beliefs, trauma or overwhelming negativity, their afterlife environment will mirror these thought states. The afterlife is more of a state of mind than an objective physical environment like we are used to on earth. In Part II of this series, we are going to look at what happens when souls go into death with serious traumas, emotional attachments, unresolved pain or anger, or proclivities toward violence or hatred.
These ideas are possibly close to where a "Science of Religion", in the tradition of Myers & James, might take us if post-mortem survival is proven or at the least if Super Psi is the only reasonable(?) competitor left standing.

But it seems this kind of understanding of the afterlife suggests the fate of one's soul is largely up to one's own actions rather than the intercession of a deity? That if there is to be a relationship with God it is a personal one?

What I suspect might happen is religions will be around as options, perhaps akin to the many diet plans we have, with none being definitive or strictly necessary in most cases but still rather useful in ensuring a "healthy" afterlife.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#50
Against Tradition: Anarchism in a Magical Context

My attention was again drawn back to the Goddess. Her face was…haunting; beautiful yet otherwordly. Hestia stated in no uncertain terms that she desired I become her devotee and build her an altar in my home. Most might consider this a special calling, perhaps even destiny.

I told her no.

Well, I politely told her I really appreciated the offer but could not in good conscious become the servant of any god or goddess. I told her I’d give her special thanks and always remember to think of my home as a place her spirit was welcomed and then went on my marry way. The forest scene ended and I returned to my former nocturnal excursion.

When I tell this tale to the few pagan-oriented folk I know I often get shocked looks and gasps. An ancient Greek goddess comes calling to you and you deny her? You had been chosen and you said no? You denied the will of the Gods?

Yes I had, just as easily as I will deny the Will of the State and Society.


The two possibilities of the Fed’s raiding my home and making me disappear or a pissed off Goddess striking me blind could have all happened. I could have and still can pay dearly. There is a chance The Good Doctor will cross the Veil far quicker than most.

Yet while I can understand this, even accept that the risk as too great or the outcome too certain, I refuse to be forced to obey these circumstances because of what the other party is or what they can do. I weigh probabilities but I do not take orders. My spiritual power and psychical energy are MINE to be given freely as I desire. To have that taken by office or custom is to lose what truly makes us human in the first place.
Perhaps this is the philosophical split between Occultism and the more hierarchical forms of Polytheism or even militant radicals and mere liberals: for some “the line” extends as far as they’ve been told, for others nothing will do unless they draw the line themselves. Few pagan faiths allow priestesses or priests self-initiation. Magic is practically rife with it and for good reason.

Gordon White in his new book The Chaos Protocols(review forthcoming) notes:

“Boiled down to its essence, a self-initiation is a declaration to the universe that you have a seat at the table, that your Highest is united with your Lowest, and you expect the cosmic croupier to deal you in. It is a fundamentally radical act, a transgressive move. It runs counter to almost two thousand years of social, economic, and religious diktat. There is a lot to burn through, which is why you must persist in your transgression until the volume of High Strangeness in your life is so extreme it cannot be interpreted as anything other than contact.

Self-initiation? The individual bypassing years of established protocol and getting direct contact with the spirit world? You can’t do that! By the Gods, what about our traditional hierarchies?

Only you can. And we have. Many times before.

I remind you it was this exact kind of transgression that started the myriad of spiritual traditions we see in the world today, people called by the spirits or seeking them out on a hunt for knowledge and power.
 
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Sciborg_S_Patel

#51
Modern Fictions – How the Sacred Manifests in Chaos, Superheroes and Outer Spaces

Around this time literate and literary magicians were cropping up everywhere, writing tracts on magic for a modern reader. Many of these literary figures were connected to the Golden Dawn system of magic. Yet another emerging stream was that of chaos magic which originated in United Kingdom in the late seventies. This broader magical path was liberal enough to combine forms of neoshamanism, eastern philosophy, quantum science, visionary art, and later computer technology. This experimental perspective on magic was part of a wider trend in experimenting with known forms for new avenues of stimulating and awakening consciousness. These ‘chaotic’ paths were attempting to destabilize our conditioning patterns and our resultant consensus reality. They were all aimed at waking up the usually-slumbering human mind. As the seminal work Waking Up (1986) by Charles Tart showed, humanity was largely intoxicated with a ‘consensus trance’ that kept us from recognizing sigils of the sacred. In more recent years the metaphors and memes of being trapped within a waking dream, or of dreams within dreams, have been explored in such popular films as ‘The Truman Show’ (1998); the ‘Matrix Trilogy’ (1999-2003); and Inception (2010). Part of the myth we find ourselves popularising is the mythology that we are in some sort of constructed reality – a gnostic-inspired simulacrum of truth.

Gnostic ideas are being gnawed over, processed, and consumed in ever more popular forms of culture. There’s an odd wave of mystical-spiritual impulses now radiating through popular culture that encourages us to throw ourselves into new world-spaces, fantastic realms, and mythological fictions and factions. These are new mash-ups of the counterculture now being packaged and presented as part of mainstream culture. And in recent years the most extraordinary success in this area has been the incredible, phenomenal rise of the modern superhero.
Perhaps through the loss of our gods we have had to become our own multiple gods, as we realized a need to fill a vacuum left by myth. With the loss of the godly connection a different psychic wave was released upon the world to coincide with a rising arc of human consciousness. According to Jung, the gods gradually became our disease –

‘The gods have become diseases…who unwittingly let loose psychic epidemics on the world.’[1]

These diseases have now morphed into mutations that make us into a hybrid human-god, with superhuman capacities, yet shunned by the world for being heretical against the natural order. We have the X-Men walking amongst us, a mutant subspecies of humans. The natural order is evo-mythological – it is sacred, beyond human, and connects us with evolutionary currents. In the absence of our ancient myths we have ingested the sacred alchemical root and through pop-culture morphed this transformation into the new wave of superheroes – myth lives anew in spandex. Maybe it is a cliché because it is true; we wish to find the personal superhero within each of us – the journey of the individual, unfolding within the great cosmic drama. This myth – this journey – has largely been taken from us through scientific rationalism and an industrial modernity. Yet now, by becoming more than oneself, we serve the larger story arc.

Our popular subcultures are gradually becoming the norm. It is not only a question of whether more people are interested or not, but rather that these ideas are more widely available now thanks to popular culture. As William Irwin Thompson notes –

‘We Americans, who are so intent on creating a culture of technological materialism, cannot take in esoteric lore directly; it has to find another way in, and so comic books, science fiction, and movies are the back door.’ [2]

Popular culture has been the back door for most of us, and not just for the Americans. But now perhaps the door frames are merging into the background and disappearing altogether. The waking life and the dream are becoming part of the same movie plot, as in Richard Linklater’s film version of Philip K. Dick’s A Scanner Darkly (2006). We are more and more waking up into our own movie – our very own Truman Show – where ideas are seeded directly into our environments in order to catalyze our awakening. Like the ancient Eastern tales told us, we have been asleep in a distant land and now we are receiving messages – signals – flashing like neon signs through our popular culture. This marks our juncture, our crisis point, between moving toward waking up or falling back into archaic, catastrophic and catatonic slumber. Again, Thompson reminds us that we

‘intuitively sense our evolutionary crisis and are expressing the catastrophe bifurcation through art – primarily through science fiction.’[3]

Our ultra high-definition visual culture is acting like a portal for the otherworld to enter. The psychedelic experiences that were once fringe and condemned are being re-played out through modern fictions that blend Gnostic tropes, mythological memes, and multidimensional portholes. Transcendental states of consciousness, ratified by the far explorations of new science, are adding to the mix of a new 21st century mythology that as of yet remains unnamed.
John. E Mack, an American professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, in his later years became a leading authority on the spiritual or transformational effects of the alien abduction experience. Mack came to view the alien abduction phenomenon as acting as a catalyst to

‘shatter the boundaries of the psyche and to open consciousness to a wider sense of existence and connection in the universe.’[6]

For more than a decade Mack rigorously studied the alien abduction phenomenon and interviewed hundreds of people (whom Mack referred to as ‘experiencers’). What initially started out as an exercise in studying mental illness soon turned into an in-depth inquiry into personal and spiritual transformation. Mack eventually came to see the alien abduction phenomenon as one of the most powerful agents for spiritual growth, personal transformation, and expanded awareness – in other words, as a trigger for a sacred experience. Despite the external anxiety produced by the experience, it was clear to both Mack and his set of experiencers that a profound communion was being established between humankind and other realities. Further, that this interaction was catalyzing a shift in human consciousness toward collapsing the old models of materialistic duality and opening up a connection not only ‘beyond the Earth’ but with other dimensional realities. Mack notes that

‘the process of psychospiritual opening that the abduction phenomenon provokes may bring experiencers to a still deeper level of consciousness where the oneness or interconnectedness of creation becomes a compelling reality.’[7]

This interconnectedness became a channel for the experiencers (abductees) to receive an impressive range of information; such as healing knowledge, spiritual truths, science, technology, and ecology. A major part of the information was apparently concerning the status of the Earth and humanity’s relationship with its environment. Many of the experiencers referred to their own abduction phenomenon as participating in a trans-dimensional or interspecies relationship. The transformative effects of these unusual encounters were often remarkable. Mack’s experiencers talked about an expansion of psychic or intuitive abilities; a heightened reverence for nature; the feeling of having a special mission on Earth; the collapse of space/time perception; an understanding of multi-dimensions of reality and the existence of multi-verses; a feeling of connection with all of creation; and a whole range of related transpersonal experiences. Significant from these accounts is that, according to the experiencers, the abduction phenomenon is sometimes accompanied by a sense of moving into, or connecting with, other realities or dimensions. The sacred space and outer space were becoming one and the same. Or to put it another way, the contact initiated from those ‘out there’ was having a catalyzing effect to trigger an awakening in the inner spaces way ‘down here.’ It made sense then that our human future was going to include space migration. And according to our galactic cousins, it may even be a necessity if we continued to mess up our planetary home as if it were nothing but a playground to scoff around in.
The game changer coming onto the scene is the participatory mind of human consciousness. The coming space migration is a reflection of our expanding inner spaces. We are toying with these memes in our popular culture now ahead of their coming actualization. What our fictions are dealing with are the blueprints before we’re ready to go the full hog. And that’s why we’re in a period of incredible experimentation – we are juggling with a new type of energy coming into our cultural realities. And this new pranic force is getting expressed in a myriad of multiple forms; be it creatively, chaotically, commercially, or crazily. It’s a cacophony of exuberance and experimentation trying to find its harmonic resonance. We are gaming, bopping, and trailblazing our way into a re-identification with a sacred energy. There’s a strong sense of the sacred filtering through our modern cultural memes, and it’s not all as chaotic as it seems.
 
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