Jasun Horsley, Socio-Spiritual Engineering |392|

Hi Jim. I kinda get this, but surely that narrow range isn't a case of critical measures such that a degree, or a fraction thereof, makes a vital difference. Of course I get that there are situations where one degree more hits fail line. But here's a point - when an official temperature measuring station records, say 40 degrees C the actual temperatures experienced by people might be as high as 50+ degrees C - depending on the location. In Australia official temperature measures are taken in a covered box with slatted sides. A person standing beside the box in full sun will experience a much higher temperature. So when we were told that Penrith had a temperature of 43 degrees C last summer all that meant was that it was 43 degrees C at the point of controlled and standardised measuring. In winter I record temperatures 5 or more degrees cooler than the official recorder for my district. I have had snow in my back garden while in the front all the snow melted days ago - and on days when the official temperature is around 4 degrees.
I don't think Jim said anything technically wrong, but your wider point makes perfect sense.

It is obvious that measurements of daily temperature can only be good to a finite accuracy. While Jim is right that you can use a thermometer to make measurements that are slightly more accurate than the gradations on the side, most of the measurements taken from weather stations, were taken for the purposes of weather, and I don't suppose those who took the measurements bothered to achieve the ultimate accuracy. Thus when it is claimed that the earth is 0.8 C hotter than it was in 1880, even that number may be wrong.

The practice of averaging a large number of such measurements and then looking for 0.01 C variations from year to year, seems to me to be just voodoo science.

In chemistry, melting points are important as a measure of purity, but even so, back in the 1970's, our thermometers were marked in tenths of a degree, and I notice that even now melting point data is normally quoted to this accuracy. In order to obtain that level of accuracy, within a laboratory, the sample is held in a small glass tube in a well stirred bath of liquid, which is slowly heated to ensure that the temperature is actually homogeneous to that degree of precision. Nowadays you probably put the sample into a machine! Measurements like that took time, and we had to do them as part of our practical exams - kind of stressful!

David
 
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The woman in now about 60 years old. She told me, that when she was five, her father would use her as bait to attract young boys in the park, who he would kidnap, take to his basement, and make her watch, as he raped and then murdered the boys. She said she witnessed this more than once, and on one occasion, she left her body, and left the house, and was greeted by a being of "golden light", who gave her comfort and reassurance. She says she is still in contact with this being.
I have come to realise that it is extremely difficult to get a clear, consistent of the larger reality.

However, people do seem to go into NDE's in moments of extreme stress, even when they are not close to death. There has never been much evidence that angels, or whatever you like to call them, stop evil acts being committed - just comfort those who find themselves in extreme situations.

This all dissolves into the general question of what is life for, and why some people are permitted to become evil. I don't claim to understand it.

David
 
I have come to realise that it is extremely difficult to get a clear, consistent of the larger reality.

However, people do seem to go into NDE's in moments of extreme stress, even when they are not close to death. There has never been much evidence that angels, or whatever you like to call them, stop evil acts being committed - just comfort those who find themselves in extreme situations.

This all dissolves into the general question of what is life for, and why some people are permitted to become evil. I don't claim to understand it.

David
As for now, the greatest force for evil in the world remains the state. Nobody and nothing else is responsible for so much suffering, confusion and enslavement. Look at this concise yet valid picture-summary of the results of Communism, Fascism and Capitalism:

https://attackthesystem.com/2019/01/06/52524/

Anarchism is yet the only social (non-)system that wasn't tried already, with catastrophic results. Maybe it worths a try?
 
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I'm a bit late on this but I wanted to commend Alex for having Jasun on and allowing him to challenge the likes of Strieber and Kripal on his podcast. I wish more of the thoughtful skeptical podcasts like Rune Soup and THC would engage with him (even though he publicly states he won't listen to them and probably wouldn't engage with them). He can certainly be bristly and many won't touch his work. Even better, it would be lovely to hear Kripal or Strieber actually address the concerns raised by Jasun's research. Perhaps this is beyond wishful thinking.

Has anyone read Jasun's The Vice of Kings? Like Prisoner of Infinity, I found it a fascinating if not depressing read. Even though I had already digested a majority of the material through reading Jasun's blog, the book had just enough additional fascia weaving it all together to make it worth the purchase. I hope Alex has him back to discuss this and delve deeper into what they already touched on in this interview.
 
I'm a bit late on this but I wanted to commend Alex for having Jasun on and allowing him to challenge the likes of Strieber and Kripal on his podcast. I wish more of the thoughtful skeptical podcasts like Rune Soup and THC would engage with him (even though he publicly states he won't listen to them and probably wouldn't engage with them). He can certainly be bristly and many won't touch his work. Even better, it would be lovely to hear Kripal or Strieber actually address the concerns raised by Jasun's research. Perhaps this is beyond wishful thinking.

Has anyone read Jasun's The Vice of Kings? Like Prisoner of Infinity, I found it a fascinating if not depressing read. Even though I had already digested a majority of the material through reading Jasun's blog, the book had just enough additional fascia weaving it all together to make it worth the purchase. I hope Alex has him back to discuss this and delve deeper into what they already touched on in this interview.
thx RC... Jasun is an interesting guy... I like him and admire his willingness to go place others won't. I'd like to have him back to talk about the vice of kings. gotta figure out how to approach this topic... don't want to stare into the abyss just for the sake of staring :)

BTW am interviewing sarah westall re jim rothstein
 
don't want to stare into the abyss just for the sake of staring
That is a completely understandable concern. There's a lot more to The Vice of Kings than the child abuse angle, even though that does tend to overshadow everything else. It seems to me hard to get a handle on how you might explore this and add additional value/meaning because Jasun has focused more in his last two books on what is happening than providing speculation on why it is happening, except of course "control". I think Kripal's work actually may be of help in starting to point towards the why, though it is dangerously close to making out trauma to be good or at least a necessary evil (though I'm not wholly convinced that is even a bad thing... perhaps I'm traumatized myself).

You may also want to read Jasun's latest series of blog posts "Psychological Operatives in Hollywood" as it appears it could be forming the basis of the next in his line of books exploring these topics. It was in the comment section on one of those posts I found a lead which seems to be another compelling part of the why and how of the ancient pattern of occulted abuse puzzle. Perhaps this Bryan Hayden would be a good potential guest.
"A very interesting book that looks into the origins of the phenomena of how all this stuff began would be Brian Hayden’s “The Power of Ritual in Prehistory: Secret Societies and Origins of Social Complexity”, Cambridge, 2018. The book definitely figures out something important about human beings by focusing its lens on the phenomena of a) being hungry for power, and b) the practice of lying. By combining these very obvious human behaviors, Hayden looks at the ethnographic evidences from North America, Oceania, and Africa, and finds plenty of instances of what he calls “transegalitarian secret societies”, which, more or less, are a form of secret organization which enhances the networking power of ‘aggrandizers’ who seek to add to their own individual power. These bodies combined ecstatic shamanism, a belief in spirits who demand human sacrifice, and devious conversation that ultimately resulted in a coordinated manipulation of their individual societies and, if it ever happen to arose, to come to one another’s aid to help deal with intransigents who challenged the constructed order.

Overtime, these bodies and their chosen sites of ritual evolved into ‘super-secret society structures’, producing sites like Stonehenge, Chauvin de Huantar, Jerf el Ahmar, and Gobekli tepe. Some of these ‘superstructures’ would later evolve into official cult centers – such as Eridu in Sumeria, which later became involved in the organization of a larger economy. Hayden mentions the temples of Melqart as an example of a secret society/mafia type structure which operated during the heyday of the Phoenecian state."
 
That is a completely understandable concern. There's a lot more to The Vice of Kings than the child abuse angle, even though that does tend to overshadow everything else. It seems to me hard to get a handle on how you might explore this and add additional value/meaning because Jasun has focused more in his last two books on what is happening than providing speculation on why it is happening, except of course "control". I think Kripal's work actually may be of help in starting to point towards the why, though it is dangerously close to making out trauma to be good or at least a necessary evil (though I'm not wholly convinced that is even a bad thing... perhaps I'm traumatized myself).
agree on all accounts :) I love jeff but I think he's more wrong and right on this one.

You may also want to read Jasun's latest series of blog posts "Psychological Operatives in Hollywood" as it appears it could be forming the basis of the next in his line of books exploring these topics. It was in the comment section on one of those posts I found a lead which seems to be another compelling part of the why and how of the ancient pattern of occulted abuse puzzle. Perhaps this Bryan Hayden would be a good potential guest.
thx. I'll check it out. hey RC what do you think about helping me organize a future show on this... interested ?
 
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