New Communication Discovered in Brain: Is This the Mechanism for Telepathy?

#2
Electric fields activating neurons instead of transmitters. Reminds me of NDErs saying electric devices break around them. Consciousness might have something to do with EM fields. Maybe the field produced by the brain is the code for conscious experiences, this would resolve the binding problem.

I must say though I don't take telepathy seriously. All evidence I've seen are statistical anomalies, there's no wow factor like sending a 20 digit number across a room.
 
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#4
Typical modern telepathy experiments are performed with the participants sitting in different rooms (sometimes different buildings). One or both rooms is also electromagnetically shielded by a Faraday cage.

Let's consider the ganzfeld type of experiment, where the receiver sits in a sensory deprived environment. If each trial has four possibilities, the average success rate should work out at 25%. Typically the actual average outcome is over 30%. Whether you want to call that a 'statistical anomaly' or not, you certainly need something to explain it!

Is there anything in the papers referred to here that could possibly be relevant in explaining experiments of this sort?

David
 
#5
"Is This the Mechanism for Telepathy?"

I don't think telepathy can be produced by the brain because if there are any neural structures in the brain that encode information, different brains are not likely to store the same information in identical structures. Neural connections are formed during development and during learning and will be different for different people.

http://ncu9nc.blogspot.com/2014/04/near-death-experiences-and-afterlife.html#facts_esp
 
#6
Typical modern telepathy experiments are performed with the participants sitting in different rooms (sometimes different buildings). One or both rooms is also electromagnetically shielded by a Faraday cage.

Let's consider the ganzfeld type of experiment, where the receiver sits in a sensory deprived environment. If each trial has four possibilities, the average success rate should work out at 25%. Typically the actual average outcome is over 30%. Whether you want to call that a 'statistical anomaly' or not, you certainly need something to explain it!

Is there anything in the papers referred to here that could possibly be relevant in explaining experiments of this sort?

David
are there controls for those telepathy experiments? e.g. tell people not to try send the message to the other person. if this is repeated and every time the people try to send ~30% is achieved, and ~25% is achieved when the people don't try to send, i'd look into it. i remember asking dean radin, he didn't answer directly but gave the impression there werent any control experiments.
 
#7
are there controls for those telepathy experiments? e.g. tell people not to try send the message to the other person. if this is repeated and every time the people try to send ~30% is achieved, and ~25% is achieved when the people don't try to send, i'd look into it. i remember asking dean radin, he didn't answer directly but gave the impression there werent any control experiments.
What exactly do you want in the way of controls for this sort of experiment? I have heard people ask for controls for such experiments before, but I don't think the concept is meaningful.

Please describe what you think would make a useful control experiment for telepathy?

These experiments are constructed so that in the absence of any information passing between sender and receiver, the receiver would get the right answer 1 time in 4. Remarkably that is now what actually happens.

David
 
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