TALKING EVIL WITH ALEX TSAKIRIS -- GORDON WHITE -- RUNE SOUP

I'm not saying rioting is the answer, but what is it that "works"? If you are somehow the unique holder of this information, please share it. Seems the loads of really good people who have earnestly wanted to solve this problem haven't figured out the magical "what works" plan just yet.
Well analysing the actual problem might be a good start.

Police target black people on the streets, not because they are racist - many of the police are black - but because the blacks commit so much crime. Putting a lot of effort into shutting down gangs would be a start. I would try more legalisation of drugs, because the present laws simply drive what could be a legal trade into the hands of criminals. As it is, police are just doing their job when they get in the way of this trade.

I'd also try to encourage black kids and parents to take an interest in education.

Forget daft pseudo-academic ideas such as systemic racism and focus on specific problems.

I don't know what President Trump was suggesting in the way of police reforms, but clearly the Democratics want to try to win on this issue, so there was no point in actually negotiating with the president, or even tabling his proposals for a discussion in Congress.

David
 
I don't know that he's that happy. Anyone that has to talk himself up like that, is compensating. I know what you mean about being financially stable, though. Why are some people better off than others? I don't think we'll ever know.
It's hard to imagine that he's happy. Where is there time or space for happiness in that lifestyle? I suspect he has a personality disorder birthed by early emotional neglect. That's gonna make it nearly impossible to be happy, too. Financial stability can definitely be a plus. It's better to have it than to not have it, that's for sure. What I'd like to know, though, is what spiritual agencies - assuming they exist (I'm inclined to think they do) - allow such clearly incompetent and ill-equipped individuals to run the world? This is not to say Hillary Clinton would have been fantastic, either. There's a lot of false choice either/or dichotomous thinking going on with this thread and the world in general, these days. There's a lot more than two ways to think about a thing.

About 18 years ago I had a distressing dream in which I was dressed in clothing from the 17th/18th century. I was dirty, very poor, I had two young children to care for, and my wife was recently deceased. The emotional atmosphere was intolerable. I don't know for certain that it was a past life memory, but I woke up reaching out for my children and it took several minutes to realize who I was in this life - a single, childless, young man.

There's something about poverty that I hate. I've been fortunate in this life to have been largely protected from experiencing it, but I never feel safe enough - largely because the principles that our culture is founded on enable some to amass ludicrous amounts of wealth and power and make it damn near impossible for others to attain upward mobility. This game is fixed by the power elite and protected by them via a political circling of the wagons. Most of the "culture wars" politics that we get routinely bogged down in is manufactured bullshit to keep our eyes off the real issues. Who gives a fuck about a statues of slave owning, treasonous assholes from a century and a half ago? They don't have feelings. They don't struggle to make a life for themselves today. They didn't embody the values that the Light impresses upon NDErs. They didn't lift a finger to improve people's lives. And arguing over it today is a perfect way for the power elite to stop us from looking at the machinery that perpetually creates ludicrous levels of inequality and leaves the bulk of humanity fighting over the scraps that fall off their tables.

Here's a good piece that discusses the "divide and conquer" strategy that is being used against us. You'll notice most of the talking points are proliferating right here in this thread: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/06/us/politics/trump-bubba-wallace-nascar.html
 
Well analysing the actual problem might be a good start.

Police target black people on the streets, not because they are racist - many of the police are black - but because the blacks commit so much crime. Putting a lot of effort into shutting down gangs would be a start. I would try more legalisation of drugs, because the present laws simply drive what could be a legal trade into the hands of criminals. As it is, police are just doing their job when they get in the way of this trade.

I'd also try to encourage black kids and parents to take an interest in education.

Forget daft pseudo-academic ideas such as systemic racism and focus on specific problems.

I don't know what President Trump was suggesting in the way of police reforms, but clearly the Democratics want to try to win on this issue, so there was no point in actually negotiating with the president, or even tabling his proposals for a discussion in Congress.

David
I've met plenty of black folks who care about education and who have pursued it extensively in their lives. This whole focusing on race thing is an intentional red herring. The issue is economic injustice and intergenerational trauma, largely caused by economic injustice: https://prospect.org/features/trouble-diversity/

We love race -- we love identity -- because we don't love class. We love thinking that the differences that divide us are not the differences between those of us who have money and those who don't but are instead the differences between those of us who are black and those who are white or Asian or Latino or whatever. A world where some of us don't have enough money is a world where the differences between us present a problem: the need to get rid of inequality or to justify it. A world where some of us are black and some of us are white -- or bi-racial or Native American or transgendered -- is a world where the differences between us present a solution: appreciating our diversity. So we like to talk about the differences we can appreciate, and we don't like to talk about the ones we can't. Indeed, we don't even like to acknowledge that they exist. As survey after survey has shown, Americans are very reluctant to identify themselves as belonging to the lower class and even more reluctant to identify themselves as belonging to the upper class. The class we like is the middle class.

But the fact that we all like to think of ourselves as belonging to the same class doesn't, of course, mean that we actually do belong to the same class. In reality, we obviously and increasingly don't. “The last few decades,” as The Economist puts it, “have seen a huge increase in inequality in America.” The rich are different from you and me, and one of the ways they're different is that they're getting richer and we're not. And while it's not surprising that most of the rich and their apologists on the intellectual right are unperturbed by this development, it is at least a little surprising that the intellectual left has managed to remain almost equally unperturbed. Giving priority to issues like affirmative action and committing itself to the celebration of difference, the intellectual left has responded to the increase in economic inequality by insisting on the importance of cultural identity. So for 30 years, while the gap between the rich and the poor has grown larger, we've been urged to respect people's identities -- as if the problem of poverty would be solved if we just appreciated the poor. From the economic standpoint, however, what poor people want is not to contribute to diversity but to minimize their contribution to it -- they want to stop being poor. Celebrating the diversity of American life has become the American left's way of accepting their poverty, of accepting inequality.
When both Sanders and Warren got knocked out of the race, we were left with this identity politics bullshit. Now nothing will improve and we can spend another 4-8 years getting looted by the neolibs.

What does race matter when we're dead? Aren't we all just beings of light and consciousness then? Will we be able to tell who looked like what after we've died and we're in our true forms? I grew up frightened of black people because I grew up in the middle of nowhere and I only knew black people through portrayals in movies and TV. Since then, I've worked in prisons with a largely black population, supervised an urban halfway house whose residents and staff were nearly entirely black, and now live in a mixed neighborhood with black neighbors. It has changed me. It took my fear and assumptions away.

I can say this, though - poor, emotionally neglected and traumatized people, regardless of race, act damn near identically. Few who have lived through those conditions care about education. They don't care much for anything that isn't immediately relevant - because that's what chronic trauma and neglect does to a human mind.
 
Last edited:
I've met plenty of black folks who care about education and who have pursued it extensively in their lives. This whole focusing on race thing is an intentional red herring. The issue is economic injustice and intergenerational trauma, largely caused by economic injustice: https://prospect.org/features/trouble-diversity/
Exactly - race does not matter, and should not matter. That makes an organisation like Black Lives Matter, wrong and racist be definition.

Really it isn't race, but culture. My parents weren't rich, but they valued education, and I'd have been in a lot of trouble if I had started spending a lot of time out with rowdy kids, etc etc. I do think that black culture can be a problem - but it is far less about money.
When both Sanders and Warren got knocked out of the race, we were left with this identity politics bullshit. Now nothing will improve and we can spend another 4-8 years getting looted by the neolibs.
Well remember that I do not believe "Climate Change" is a risk to anyone, so that would have put me off Sanders, but I could have voted for Tulsi Gabard (if I were a US citizen), because she clearly knows the utter horror of war, and the value of keeping out of them.
What does race matter when we're dead? Aren't we all just beings of light and consciousness then?
I think if you read Jurgen Ziewe, for example, you see a picture of the afterlife that is much more varied - I am sure there is scope for a range of cultures up there.
Will we be able to tell who looked like what after we've died and we're in our true forms?
I used to assume that when we die all is revealed. I am less sure about that now.
I grew up frightened of black people because I grew up in the middle of nowhere and I only knew black people through portrayals in movies and TV.
There wasn't a single black in any of the three schools I went to - but there had been far less immigration in those days.
Since then, I've worked in prisons with a largely black population, supervised an urban halfway house whose residents and staff were nearly entirely black, and now live in a mixed neighborhood with black neighbors. It has changed me. It took my fear and assumptions away.
The only thing I fear is aggressive, violent mobs - regardless of colour. Ask yourself if the problems you encountered in that work were primarily caused by lack of money - do you think they had any less money (adjusted for inflation) that your parents had. I honestly think it is primarily about a culture that doesn't value education much - indeed I have read pieces by educated black people who say exactly that. Try talking to educated blacks and ask them where the problem lies. Unless they have been politicised, I'd be surprised if they don't tell you that.
I can say this, though - poor, emotionally neglected and traumatized people, regardless of race, act damn near identically. Few who have lived through those conditions care about education. They don't care much for anything that isn't immediately relevant - because that's what chronic trauma and neglect does to a human mind.
That is probably true, but there are other things that make people uninterested in education. For example if their friends are going out with 'expensive' girls, and explain that all they need to do is join the gang and sell drugs so they can do the same.

Sadly, I also think education will appeal less and less to large swathes of people as it becomes infested with 'woke' ideas. Who (black or white) wants to go to suffocating classes on race, or all 57 varieties of gender, or complex theories that somehow square that fact that certain minorities tread on the toes of others.

If you still know some educated blacks, why not ask them, or better still invite them to join us here to discuss.

David
 
Last edited:
About 18 years ago I had a distressing dream in which I was dressed in clothing from the 17th/18th century. I was dirty, very poor, I had two young children to care for, and my wife was recently deceased. The emotional atmosphere was intolerable. I don't know for certain that it was a past life memory, but I woke up reaching out for my children and it took several minutes to realize who I was in this life - a single, childless, young man.

There's something about poverty that I hate. I've been fortunate in this life to have been largely protected from experiencing it, but I never feel safe enough - largely because the principles that our culture is founded on enable some to amass ludicrous amounts of wealth and power and make it damn near impossible for others to attain upward mobility.
It is possible that your dream was of a genuine past life - though it is not for me to make any such assessment. But still, assuming it was real, then that might explain why, as you put it, " I never feel safe enough".

Our present-day drives and fears may be rooted in subconscious recall of past-life experiences, to a greater extent than we realise. In the Western culture we are not taught to understand ourselves, our drives and motivations in the context of these longer-timescales, spanning multiple lives.
 
It's hard to imagine that he's happy. Where is there time or space for happiness in that lifestyle? I suspect he has a personality disorder birthed by early emotional neglect. That's gonna make it nearly impossible to be happy, too. Financial stability can definitely be a plus. It's better to have it than to not have it, that's for sure. What I'd like to know, though, is what spiritual agencies - assuming they exist (I'm inclined to think they do) - allow such clearly incompetent and ill-equipped individuals to run the world? This is not to say Hillary Clinton would have been fantastic, either. There's a lot of false choice either/or dichotomous thinking going on with this thread and the world in general, these days. There's a lot more than two ways to think about a thing.

About 18 years ago I had a distressing dream in which I was dressed in clothing from the 17th/18th century. I was dirty, very poor, I had two young children to care for, and my wife was recently deceased. The emotional atmosphere was intolerable. I don't know for certain that it was a past life memory, but I woke up reaching out for my children and it took several minutes to realize who I was in this life - a single, childless, young man.

There's something about poverty that I hate. I've been fortunate in this life to have been largely protected from experiencing it, but I never feel safe enough - largely because the principles that our culture is founded on enable some to amass ludicrous amounts of wealth and power and make it damn near impossible for others to attain upward mobility. This game is fixed by the power elite and protected by them via a political circling of the wagons. Most of the "culture wars" politics that we get routinely bogged down in is manufactured bullshit to keep our eyes off the real issues. Who gives a fuck about a statues of slave owning, treasonous assholes from a century and a half ago? They don't have feelings. They don't struggle to make a life for themselves today. They didn't embody the values that the Light impresses upon NDErs. They didn't lift a finger to improve people's lives. And arguing over it today is a perfect way for the power elite to stop us from looking at the machinery that perpetually creates ludicrous levels of inequality and leaves the bulk of humanity fighting over the scraps that fall off their tables.

Here's a good piece that discusses the "divide and conquer" strategy that is being used against us. You'll notice most of the talking points are proliferating right here in this thread: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/06/us/politics/trump-bubba-wallace-nascar.html
I'm in total agreement with you. I was really disappointed when Bernie went down. In my mind, he was the only politician that really spoke truth to the issues. I am hopeful that our current P.O.T.U.S. will be voted out soon and then we can breathe for a bit. I am not a fan of the Neo-Liberals and don't think much change will happen...for the reasons you said. I don't think many politicians want real change...their power and finances would be affected. I do wonder if that is the only real reason our country is the way it is. Money and power are the only "real" things. All this other stuff is just divide and conquer tactics. Not that race isn't an issue but in terms of the higher ups...it's just being used to confuse the issues. I have been thinking about egregores lately. Any thoughts about that? Maybe our collective thoughts are producing our current climate?
 
I'm in total agreement with you. I was really disappointed when Bernie went down. In my mind, he was the only politician that really spoke truth to the issues. I am hopeful that our current P.O.T.U.S. will be voted out soon and then we can breathe for a bit. I am not a fan of the Neo-Liberals and don't think much change will happen...for the reasons you said. I don't think many politicians want real change...their power and finances would be affected. I do wonder if that is the only real reason our country is the way it is. Money and power are the only "real" things. All this other stuff is just divide and conquer tactics. Not that race isn't an issue but in terms of the higher ups...it's just being used to confuse the issues. I have been thinking about egregores lately. Any thoughts about that? Maybe our collective thoughts are producing our current climate?
I think the reason people liked Bernie is the same reason people like Trump. Neither one is a globalist. It's not really Republican vs Democrat any more, it's whether or not they support the globalist elite. The democrats had some good options (Tulsi Gabard being one of them), but they went with Biden instead.
 
I think the reason people liked Bernie is the same reason people like Trump. Neither one is a globalist. It's not really Republican vs Democrat any more, it's whether or not they support the globalist elite. The democrats had some good options (Tulsi Gabard being one of them), but they went with Biden instead.
That is a good point!

I never really heard what Sanders view was regarding foreign relations and defence. Unless we reach a point where the Neocons have all been removed, anyone in the WH has to be very savvy to avoid being tricked into a war. I mean, to be clear, I have previously backed the Democrats, but this time was different. A Republican that ran on trying to avoid conflict was extremely attractive. Also, after exploring the 'Climate Change' issue a bit, I honestly do not believe the problem is real - and neither does President Trump.

David
 
Last edited:
I think the reason people liked Bernie is the same reason people like Trump. Neither one is a globalist. It's not really Republican vs Democrat any more, it's whether or not they support the globalist elite. The democrats had some good options (Tulsi Gabard being one of them), but they went with Biden instead.
I would have gone with Tulsi though, I am so jaded, I am unsure these "elections" are legit (and that includes the last presidential election). This has a lot to do with the "view" I hold which parallel's the view of David Icke in this regard... presidents are selected, not "elected."
 
I would have gone with Tulsi though, I am so jaded, I am unsure these "elections" are legit (and that includes the last presidential election). This has a lot to do with the "view" I hold which parallel's the view of David Icke in this regard... presidents are selected, not "elected."
I really like Tulsi Gabard. Hillary Clinton did everything possible to hurt her, which really shows how corrupt the Clinton's are.
 
Here’s some insightful political and spiritual commentary from another presidential candidate, Kanye West: https://www.dailystar.co.uk/showbiz/kanye-west-says-coronavirus-vaccine-22321521

"So when they say the way we’re going to fix Covid is with a vaccine, I’m extremely cautious. That’s the mark of the beast.

He continued: "They want to put chips inside of us, they want to do all kinds of things, to make it where we can’t cross the gates of heaven.
"I’m sorry when I say they, the humans that have the Devil inside them.


"And the sad thing is that, the saddest thing is that we all won’t make it to heaven, that there’ll be some of us that do not make it."
 
Another reason Cancel Culture is evil. It can used to justify acts of violence that should never be considered acceptable. In this case, a man assaulted someone and lied about the victim using a racial slur.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...Macys-manager-unprovoked-attack-arrested.html

In a viral video filmed on June 15, Palmer was seen pummeling the Macy's store attendant, alleging that he had called him the n-word.

Police charged Palmer on June 26, saying there was no evidence to suggest the employee had used the racial slur, and that the vicious attack was unprovoked.
 
can you point me to anything where this is succinctly summed up?
not yet... so far it seems to be spread across multiple recordings from sessions of a course he was teaching. I'll keep looking though.

one really interesting piece in that puzzle: Harland explains how "hell" seems to have evolved from Hades (greek - as you know :) ) and the related concept of Sheol (Jewish tradition), which is basically where souls go when material human bodies die. Many cultures seem to have a concept of the Underworld. Alex, is this anything you've every looked into on one of your shows...?

Some underworld links:

Inuit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adlivun

Hindu: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patala

Māori: https://pantheon.org/articles/u/underworld_maori.html

Judaism: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheol

General wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underworld
 
Last edited:

Alex

Administrator
not yet... so far it seems to be spread across multiple recordings from sessions of a course he was teaching. I'll keep looking though.

one really interesting piece in that puzzle: Harland explains how "hell" seems to have evolved from Hades (greek - as you know :) ) and the related concept of Sheol (Jewish tradition), which is basically where souls go when material human bodies die. Many cultures seem to have a concept of the Underworld. Alex, is this anything you've every looked into on one of your shows...?

Some underworld links:

Inuit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adlivun

Hindu: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patala

Māori: https://pantheon.org/articles/u/underworld_maori.html

Judaism: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheol

General wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underworld
on the last episode Charlie Morely talked about how is buddhist teacher instruct to explore the hellish realms in his dreams
Charlie Morely, Why His Buddhist Teacher Told ... - Skeptiko
 
on the last episode Charlie Morely talked about how is buddhist teacher instruct to explore the hellish realms in his dreams
Yes! I watched that - great interview. But "hell" is different than the less specifically evil/bad/scary "Underworld" found in many, many cultures. I'm curious if this more "place were all souls go after death" version of the underworld has shown up in your conversations at all...?
 

Alex

Administrator
Yes! I watched that - great interview. But "hell" is different than the less specifically evil/bad/scary "Underworld" found in many, many cultures. I'm curious if this more "place were all souls go after death" version of the underworld has shown up in your conversations at all...?
it would be great if you could ask charlie and then report back. From what I heard his exploration of hell was very similar true how it's usually described within our christian culture
 
@Alex If you have 2 minutes, you might find this interesting: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underworld

it includes links to entires about the underworld in 20+ different cultures

i.e. Charlie's views about hell in Buddhist culture do not address the different concepts of the underworld in other cultures--including cultures ancestral to Christianity, such as Judaism.
 
Last edited:
Top