Two halves, but still whole

#1
This article has already been mentioned by @Sciborg_S_Patel in another resource thread but I think it deserves a bit more visibility.

Michael Prescott wrote a few months ago about this interesting study from the Netherlands:
http://michaelprescott.typepad.com/michael_prescotts_blog/2017/01/two-halves-but-still-whole.html

A new research study contradicts the established view that so-called split-brain patients have a split consciousness. Instead, the researchers behind the study, led by UvA psychologist Yair Pinto, have found strong evidence showing that despite being characterised by little to no communication between the right and left brain hemispheres, split brain does not cause two independent conscious perceivers in one brain. Their results are published in the latest edition of the journal Brain.

Original article:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170125093823.htm

Cheers
 
#2
Thanks for the link, I've seen this study a few times before in other places outside of this forum. To me, this and Terminal Lucidity deliver a fairly strong blow to the idea that the brain can produce consciousness.
 
#3
This article has already been mentioned by @Sciborg_S_Patel in another resource thread but I think it deserves a bit more visibility.

Michael Prescott wrote a few months ago about this interesting study from the Netherlands:
http://michaelprescott.typepad.com/michael_prescotts_blog/2017/01/two-halves-but-still-whole.html

A new research study contradicts the established view that so-called split-brain patients have a split consciousness. Instead, the researchers behind the study, led by UvA psychologist Yair Pinto, have found strong evidence showing that despite being characterised by little to no communication between the right and left brain hemispheres, split brain does not cause two independent conscious perceivers in one brain. Their results are published in the latest edition of the journal Brain.

Original article:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170125093823.htm

Cheers
Thanks, I really struggled to understand the paper on my first read. It's written so abruptly and technically that I found it near damn impossible to understand the actual experiments...

https://www.researchgate.net/profil...ed-perception-but-undivided-consciousness.pdf

I might try again, another time. As you read the paper, it becomes clear that early research on split brain was not 100% anyway, and it was carried out some time ago, probably not long after the patients had the surgery. The patients in this new study however have been split brain for many many years. Remember here though, the brain wasn't totally split, both hemispheres are still connected in other areas. As the authors conclude, it's possible that in these patients over many years, the brains plasticity and well known ability to recover from trauma, has found alternative ways of overcoming its disability.
 
#4
The comments are interesting. A nice exchange overall accentuated by a neuroscientist's quote.

So far Julio Siqueira has been stalling to post what the supposed "shortcomings" are. Is anyone here familiar with this fellow? Can we tell if he actually notices methodical issues or if this is just the usual huff and puff that we see here so often?
 
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