UFO book reading recommendations

Ian Gordon

Ninshub
Member
#1
I'm bringing these posts back from the old Skeptiko forum. On the 212 Janet Colli podcast thread, Kingtal wrote:
Bucky, try David Jacob's "The Threat". He took his methodology pretty seriously, and was at pains to sort the wheat from the chaff. He paints a pretty grim picture of what is going on.

In terms of books, I'm an ultraterrestrial guy, rather than an extraterrestrial fan. If you want books about nuts and bolts UFOology pick up anything by Stanton Friedman, or the classic Above Top Secret. The book recently released in small numbers about the crash at Aztec Ridge in New Mexico is also very interesting.

My pick for truly interesting reading is Keith Thompson's Angels and Aliens which will take you well deep into the realms of UFO tricksterism. Vallee's "Dimensions" is also essential reading.

"Operation Trojan Horse" by John Keel is also essential.

Both Keel and Vallee dedicated years of their life to chasing eye witnesses around the world, before realising that something far stranger and deeper than hypothesised interactions with "space beings " was going on.

"Operation Trojan Horse" taught me things like the most common day of the week for UFO sightings is a Wednesday
And that the phenomena, at least in the 60s, moved from state to state across the USA - like a travelling show...
Then I wrote:
On another thread a while back, someone had posted this recommended UFO reading sub-forum:

The Essential Fortean Booklist - Aliens, UFOs and ETs | TDG - Science, Magick, Myth and History

The books that were recommended most often were:

* Passport to Magonia - Jacques Vallee
* Abduction - John Mack
* Roswell: Inconvenient Facts and the Will to Believe - Karl Pflock
* UFOs and the National Security State (multi-volume) - Richard Dolan
* Project Beta - Greg Bishop
* Messengers of Deception - Jacques Vallee
* UFOs: Generals, Pilots, and Government Officials Go on the Record - Leslie Kean
* The Day After Roswell - Col Philip J Corso
* Disclosure - Steven M Greer
* Hidden Truth Forbidden Knowledge - Steven M Greer
* Wonders in the Sky - Jacques Vallee
* Penetration - Ingo Swann
* Daimonic Reality - Patrick Harpur
* Communion - Whitley Strieber
* Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Sky - Carl Jung
* The Trickster and the Paranormal - George Hansen
* Secret Places of the Lion, George Hunt Williamson
* Revelations: Alien contact and Human Deception - Jacques Vallee
* Mothman Prophecies - John Keel
* Hunt for the Skinwalker - Kelleher & Knapp

I've got other interests on my plate before plunging into the UFO field, but it's nice to have a list of works for future reading.

Here's another recommended list and some of the titles (Majic Eyes Only by Ryan Wood, Crash at Corona by Friedman, The UFO Experience by Hynek, The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects by Ruppelt) were also mentioned by the folks on the Daily Grail site:
http://www.mufonoc.org/books.htm
Kingtal responded:
I've stripped this list back a little bit to ease the burden

* Abduction - John Mack ( and add David Jacobs "The Threat" whilst on the topic of abductions)
* UFOs and the National Security State (multi-volume) - Richard Dolan - more of a reference work/history - important but quite dry
* Messengers of Deception - Jacques Vallee - read his "Dimensions" before this
* UFOs: Generals, Pilots, and Government Officials Go on the Record - Leslie Kean - very important, you can't really understand the significance of this area until you start to digest testimony from airline and military pilots - the 1986 JAL incident is something quite mind-boggling for the size of what the pilot and co-pilot saw, its manoeuvres and the duration of the sighting. I'd recommend researching this incident on its own
* The Day After Roswell - Col Philip J Corso
* Wonders in the Sky - Jacques Vallee - more of an encyclopaedia, or history, beautifully presented, nice to have on the bookshelf, but not essential reading
* Penetration - Ingo Swann - a very strange book, but thought-provoking discussion on psi and its relation to the Other and why its in the interest of powerful groups on this planet to suppress psi -
* Daimonic Reality - Patrick Harpur - essential reading, his notion of the imaginal realm is very useful in attempts to get one's head around UFO thinking - and the relationship to all sorts of Forteana
* Communion - Whitley Strieber - never read it, though it is a classic that started the whole popular culture "grey" phenomena off
* Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Sky - Carl Jung - don't bother with this one, as his opinions in this book are very cautious and guarded, and tend to be summarised ad nauseum in other writers works
* The Trickster and the Paranormal - George Hansen - very scholarly, interesting but quite dense read - useful for its overlap between psi and UFOs ( sitting half read downstairs in my study
)

* Mothman Prophecies - John Keel - an absolute classic, not dedicated solely to UFOs, but a riveting read - take it away on holiday with you..

To this list add Keith Thompson's "Angels and Aliens" one of the best written, well thought out expositions on the crossover between the nuts and bolts aspect, and the imaginal/trickster aspects of UFOs. Any person with a passing interest in the field should read this one. Memorable for recounting some hilarious sceptical explanations of sustained encounters between craft and very experienced airline pilots.
Ethan T wrote that this one is coming out in April 2014:
Encounter in Rendlesham Forest: The Inside Story of the World's Best-Documented UFO Incident
by Nick Pope, John Burroughs and Jim Penniston.

If people have other suggestions, please post them.
 
#6
I just finished Abduction today. Does Passport follow the same format--presenting case studies?
Although it mentions some specific abductees, it's organized differently. The chapters are organized more around the different conceptual aspects of the experience. He does however have chapters on 3 new cases, but these are somewhat different too. They deal with a modern day shaman, an American Indian, and perhaps another shaman, can't quite remember, though, but it links the experience back to cultures all around the world.

If you liked Abduction, you'll probably find this one refreshingly enjoyable.
 
#7
I hope the Rendlesham Forest one next April reveals more about the binary code, and is not just another ' will the truth ever be known........you'll have to wait until xxxx reveals more in his next book ?' It is bound to leave one asking more questions!

This is my favourite UFO Mystery .
 
#8
I've read 8 or 10 books about UFOs and for that small survey stuck mostly with recent works figuring, rightly or not, that they would also encompass earlier thinking. I can offer several recommendations that treat the topic from radically different viewpoints.

Jacques Vallee has been one of the UFO field's most subtle thinkers and his thoughts have evolved quite a bit over his long career. Each of his books is a sort of snapshot of his thinking in time, naturally enough. In three of his most recent books, sometimes called his trilogy, he examines the various phenomena from three points of view and develops a rich, mysterious, multi-faceted picture:
  • DIMENSIONS: A Casebook of Alien Contact by Jacques Vallee
  • CONFRONTATIONS: A Scientist's Search for Alien Contact by Jacques Vallee
  • REVELATIONS: Alien Contact and Human Deception by Jacques Vallee
For those among us who want to read about sightings and encounters from sources that many people consider to be more credible than average, the high-water mark in my experience is:
  • UFOs: Generals, Pilots, and Government Officials Go on the Record by Leslie Kean
And for a more encyclopedic and somewhat darker treatment of sightings and encounters:
  • UFOs and the National Security State: Chronology of a Coverup, 1941-1973 by Richard Dolan
  • The Cover-Up Exposed, 1973-1991 by Richard Dolan
I understand Dolan is planning to issue a third volume to bring the series up to date.

Finally, a book I found surprisingly enjoyable is:
  • Unconventional Flying Objects: A Scientific Analysis by Paul R. Hill
I say "surprisingly" because I expected it to be written from a simplistic physicalist perspective and my copy sat on my bookshelf for several years before I finally read it. In fact it turned out to be written from a quite sophisticated physicalist perspective and is a rather astounding book.

Hill had his own UFO sighting in 1952 that was investigated by Project Blue Book and classified as Unknown, and he took the subject very seriously. He was an expert on advanced propulsion methods working for NASA, and built experimental flying platforms that mimicked some of the observed UFO behavior. He wrote the book during his career but he couldn't talk about it because the official NASA policy was that UFOs don't exist; the book wasn't published until after his death. He quite credibly tackles an encyclopedic list of observed phenomena including tilt-to-maneuver, the floating leaf descent, and the infamous right-hand turn at high speed (which I witnessed, unmistakably, as a young teenager in its light-in-the-sky version), along with important questions like, what keeps the occupants from being crushed to goo by the rapid maneuvers. The only weakness from my perspective, and it is unimportant in the context of this self-contained book, is that Hill dismisses the possibility that other, non-physicalist events may also be playing a part in the broader spectrum of observed UFO phenomena.
 
#10
I just wanted to add to and resuscitate this thread. Also, Andy, is it possible that we can make this thread a sticky? I'll report my own post to call attention to it in case you miss this ;-)

Anyhow, just finished reading the Leslie Kean book, UFOS, Generals, Pilots and Government Officials Go On The Record. Excellent book!

In the book she runs with a definition of UFO that goes something along these lines: (1) an aerial phenomenon that cannot be explained under known natural or artificial means (2) which implies performance characteristics above and beyond current aerospace applications. They also remain agnostic to the "extraterrestrial hypothesis"

With that definition in mind and after reading the many impressive cases presented in the book, it's really hard to believe that whether, or not, the phenomenon is real is still a controversial matter!

Anyhow, I'd really recommend it to anybody interested in UFOs. One of the better books out there on the topic, written from a more sober, scientific viewpoint.
 
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#11
#12

Ian Gordon

Ninshub
Member
#14
And for a more encyclopedic and somewhat darker treatment of sightings and encounters:
  • UFOs and the National Security State: Chronology of a Coverup, 1941-1973 by Richard Dolan
  • The Cover-Up Exposed, 1973-1991 by Richard Dolan
I understand Dolan is planning to issue a third volume to bring the series up to date.
I'm looking forward to this, and glad he's still working at it. Here's an entry from Dolan's blog from a month ago:
I will also be working on my own research and writing for the remainder of the year. Writing UFOs for the 21st Century Mind was a great experience for me, and I am gratified by the positive reception it has received. But I am ready to get back to completing my historical trilogy. Do not expect any announcement for a release date for some time, but you should know I am thinking about the book, and will be actively working on it again by the end of the summer.

http://www.richarddolanpress.com/ta...te/c1q8z/C2C76491-98F6-4C5C-9BC4-17C9D630BB6F
 
#16
I'm currently reading LightQuest by Andrew Collins. Pretty interesting stuff and a completely different spin on UFOs.

Collins is basically arguing against the Extraterrestrial Hypothesis, in that UFOs are structured craft with grays on them. Instead he's arguing they are a type of plasma intelligence. These "plasma-balls" would have powerful electric/magnetic fields that could explain everything from aircraft malfunctions and strange conscious experiences when folks get too close to them. Apparently, some of Persinger's work was done specifically to address the UFO question along these lines. It even offers an explanation why they show up on radar sometimes and not others. Etc.

I definitely find some of his arguments compelling, but still not able to explain all UFO phenomenon. When I think of things like the Hesdellan (sp?) Lights this really makes sense. When you start to think about things like Roswell, not so much, but he does spend the first couple chapters "debunking" Roswell. Actually, kind of think of it, Collins says the Plasma phenomenon doesn't quite add up for all the Hesdellan phenomenon either. Made me wonder why, since he didn't elucidate on that.

Anyhow, it's another one that's worth a read at least. Anybody else hear of this plasma theory and have any opinions?
 
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Ian Gordon

Ninshub
Member
#18
I'm currently reading LightQuest by Andrew Collins. Pretty interesting stuff and a completely different spin on UFOs.

Collins is basically arguing against the Extraterrestrial Hypothesis, in that UFOs are structured craft with grays on them. Instead he's arguing they are a type of plasma intelligence. These "plasma-balls" would have powerful electric/magnetic fields that could explain everything from aircraft malfunctions and strange conscious experiences when folks get too close to them. Apparently, some of Persinger's work was done specifically to address the UFO question along these lines. It even offers an explanation why they show up on radar sometimes and not others. Etc.

I definitely find some of his arguments compelling, but still not able to explain all UFO phenomenon. When I think of things like the Hesdellan (sp?) Lights this really makes sense. When you start to think about things like Roswell, not so much, but he does spend the first couple chapters "debunking" Roswell. Actually, kind of think of it, Collins says the Plasma phenomenon doesn't quite add up for all the Hesdellan phenomenon either. Made me wonder why, since he didn't elucidate on that.

Anyhow, it's another one that's worth a read at least. Anybody else hear of this plasma theory and have any opinions?
Thanks for this Ethan. Sounds like a good read.

They now can be seen as sentient energy forms and complex plasma constructs manifestations of a higher dimensional reality that has co-existed with the human race since time immemorial, and was in the past seen as the Realm of Faerie. This book embraces a new understanding of the UFO phenomenon by accepting that its existence is deeply rooted in everything from quantum entanglement to multi-dimensional experiences, strange worlds that interpenetrate our own, and psychic communications.

Definitely sounds to my ears like this is on the right track.

This related article refers to that book.
http://ufodigest.com/article/are-uf...sma-their-life-force-residing-electric-energy

EDIT:
Conclusions: I stress that I also believe some UFO occupants come from time (what we call "the human future") and are probably corporeal beings, as well as other UFO occupants coming from "space" (far distant planets), who are also probably corporeal. I do not feel that "plasma" solves the UFO puzzle. I feel that we are being visited by a plethora of mind-boggling beings from all sorts of mind-boggling sources!


Plasma people (and the frequent channeling of or medium contact with) were referred to in this previous thread:
http://www.skeptiko-forum.com/threads/mythology-of-ufos-and-abduction.172/#post-3091
 
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#19
Conclusions: I stress that I also believe some UFO occupants come from time (what we call "the human future") and are probably corporeal beings, as well as other UFO occupants coming from "space" (far distant planets), who are also probably corporeal. I do not feel that "plasma" solves the UFO puzzle. I feel that we are being visited by a plethora of mind-boggling beings from all sorts of mind-boggling sources!
I like that conclusion. Occasionally in the book, you get the feeling Collins is trying to say it's ALL plasma, but I think that would be a mistake. If the Universe is as rife with life as some people are starting to think, it wouldn't be surprising if there were multiple types of beings checking us out.

Thanks for the links, I'll check 'em out!
 

Ian Gordon

Ninshub
Member
#20
I like that conclusion. Occasionally in the book, you get the feeling Collins is trying to say it's ALL plasma, but I think that would be a mistake. If the Universe is as rife with life as some people are starting to think, it wouldn't be surprising if there were multiple types of beings checking us out.

Thanks for the links, I'll check 'em out!
I get the feeling a lot - most? - UFO researchers develop a perspective and try to fit the data into it. I've heard even the sainted Vallée has been known to cherry pick.
 
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