McCartney died in 1983 (thread derailment prevention security measure)

Ian Gordon

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Without mentioning the "You Never Give Me Your Money" days, I long for this stuff:


The harmony at 1:25!
That whole McCartney album is really high on my list of favorite albums ever. Ram is probably in my Top 5 ever. It could be No. 1. It's that good.

But really, there's McCartney magic all over tunes throughout the Wings era and slightly after (McCartney II has its own do-it-in-your-home electro charm).

For instance, how can one not like this incredibly little groovy number that opens WIld Life without any real lyrics? Groovy as hell. I could go on and on.


p.s. I get really mad when people don't dig the music I dig, so watch out.
 
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That whole McCartney album is really high on my list of favorite albums ever. Ram is probably in my Top 5 ever. It could be No. 1. It's that good.

But really, there's McCartney magic all over tunes throughout the Wings era and slightly after (McCatney II has its own do-it-in-your-home electro charm).

For instance, how can one not like this incredibly little groovy number that opens WIld Life without any real lyrics? Groovy as hell. I could go on and on.


p.s. I get really mad when people don't dig the music I dig, so watch out.
Yeah, I'm a McCartney fanatic. I also like their cover of Love is Strange from that album . . . which I believe came out, actually, before McCartney McCartney.

My favorite album of possibly all time, though, is Plastic Ono, Lennon's first.
 
That whole McCartney album is really high on my list of favorite albums ever. Ram is probably in my Top 5 ever. It could be No. 1. It's that good.

But really, there's McCartney magic all over tunes throughout the Wings era and slightly after (McCatney II has its own do-it-in-your-home electro charm).

For instance, how can one not like this incredibly little groovy number that opens WIld Life without any real lyrics? Groovy as hell. I could go on and on.


p.s. I get really mad when people don't dig the music I dig, so watch out.

When I heard this song (and the rest of those following on Abbey Road), my whole life changed.

 
Without mentioning the "You Never Give Me Your Money" days, I long for this stuff:


The harmony at 1:25!
At 1:25 it is regular diatonic thirds... 99% of the chords (and vocal harmonies) are built off of that :)
At 1:27 the acute is emphasizing C in the Dm chord making it Dm7.

4 voice chords are the basics in jazz, but in pop music are pretty bold stuff :D

cheers
 
Yeah, I'm a McCartney fanatic. I also like their cover of Love is Strange from that album . . . which I believe came out, actually, before McCartney McCartney.

My favorite album of possibly all time, though, is Plastic Ono, Lennon's first.
Wild Life came out after Ram, which was after McCartney.

Best solo Beatles album of all time... (drum roll)....

Ringo the 4th. (listen at your own peril)
 
McCarney's a great bass player too, not so much technically but he knows what works. ( Like Sting)

'Something' has a fantastic baseline.
 
Wild Life came out after Ram, which was after McCartney.

Best solo Beatles album of all time... (drum roll)....

Ringo the 4th. (listen at your own peril)
Well, two things, Ian:

I humilliated in public that you had to correct me on the Wild Life thing. I knew McCartney McCartney was officially the first post Beatle album and I knew that Ram followed that . . . But I thought there was some element of Wild Life that actually took place before McCartney McCartney . . . it appears I'm wrong . . . and for everyone to see!

With the Ringo album, I'm very curious . . . post Beatle Ringo stuff is probably the one, single category I know very little about. Thanks for sharing! I'll check it out later tonight.
 
Great thread Ian. I will cheat a little and submit a track he co wrote in 1989 to support the notion that there was some life still in him. I love this:

Well, I'm inclined to try to to disqualify the cheating since you're comparing 9/11 theorists to Paul is Dead people . . . But wil let you slide

However, if you'd wanted a more interesting false belief there was the Klaatu Conspiracy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaatu_(band)

Many believed they were the Beatles reunited after the breakup, secretly recording songs. If I remember correctly, there were a couple reasons for this . . . One that I remember was that there was a lyric similar to one in Lennon's "God," that said "the dream is over."

. . . don't have time presently to really dig all the info up . . . but regardless, they kinda rotate between a kind of shitty-Beatle-esque-that's-sometimes-a-bit-hard-to-admit-is-okay to not-very-Beatle-esque-at-all sound.

Here're two albums:



Link concerning the rumors:
http://www.beatlesagain.com/breflib/klaatu.html
 
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With the Ringo album, I'm very curious . . . post Beatle Ringo stuff is probably the one, single category I know very little about. Thanks for sharing! I'll check it out later tonight.
You know you've got (or had) the disease called beatlemania real bad when you've purchased and listened to every Ringo album. (Even if they were in the 1$ bin.)
 
Great thread Ian. I will cheat a little and submit a track he co wrote in 1989 to support the notion that there was some life still in him. I love this:

Yeah I exaggerated a bit with the 83 thing. Still, that easy tunefulness he had up to then hasn't been the same since.

The Beatles are one of the reasons I believe in "God".
Wow, me too, Tim. It's better evidence than that afterlife data stuff.
 
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McCarney's a great bass player too, not so much technically but he knows what works. ( Like Sting)

'Something' has a fantastic baseline.
He's my favorite bass player, because of the melodic way he plays. (sorry Geddy.) Evidence: anything on Sgt. Pepper.

Great thick sound and playing on Wings Over America:

 
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He's my favorite bass player, because of the melodic way he plays. (sorry Geddy.) Evidence: anything on Sgt. Pepper.

Great thick sound and playing on Wings Over America:

Hey Ian,

Have you heard Krauss and Plant's album from a few years back?

I just stumbled across this live version of Killing the Blues . . . I think it's fuckin' fantastic.
 
Well, Reece, since what happened to Paul in '83, I'm afraid that as a principle I don't listen to anything produced after that year.

OK, I just made an exception and listened to the Plant track (didn't he die too?). I guess as far as meandering MOR pseudo-blues crap for semi-comatose septuagenarians go, it's... just OK.

:)

Taste is a crazy thing. It can turn the best of friends into bitter enemies. From which I can therefore safely conclude that music is ... evil. :eek:

Because is awesome, though. Since we both love Abbey Road, I guess we can still be friends. ;)
 
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When I was, say, 13, the cool stuff was Van Halen, Aerosmith, Rush, Ozzy & Black Sabbath, Judas Priest and so on. Even the Stones were vaguely suspicious in terms of being not hard rocking enough, dance-y and "sissy" (Hot Stuff? Emotional Rescue??). (I remember one particularly cynical hate-filled young dude who even considered "Start Me Up " disco). I liked those other bands, but the Beatles and McCartney/Wings were my favorites. When my friends came over, I had to hide those records as a dirty shameful secret.

Years later, I heard somebody describe Paul McCartney and WIngs as "girl music" - the stuff girls liked in the 70s. That's when I had to admit to myself that, yeah, deep down... I was a girl.
 
Well, Reece, since what happened to Paul in '83, I'm afraid that as a principle I don't listen to anything produced after that year.

OK, I just made an exception and listened to the Plant track (didn't he die too?). I guess as far as meandering MOR pseudo-blues crap for semi-comatose septuagenarians go, it's... just OK.

:)

Taste is a crazy thing. I can turn the best of friends into enemies. From which I can therefore safely conclude that music is ... evil. :eek:

Because is awesome, though. Since we both love Abbey Road, I guess we can still be friends. ;)
Jeez, Ian! I didn't know you could be so harsh!

When I was, say, 13, the cool stuff was Van Halen, Aerosmith, Rush, Ozzy & Black Sabbath, Judas Priest and so on. Even the Stones were vaguely suspicious in terms of being not hard rocking enough, dance-y and "sissy" (Hot Stuff? Emotional Rescue??). (I remember one particularly cynical hate-filled young dude who even considered "Start Me Up " disco). I liked those other bands, but the Beatles and McCartney/Wings were my favorites. When my friends came over, I had to hide those records as a dirty shameful secret.

Years later, I heard somebody describe Paul McCartney and WIngs as "girl music" - the stuff girls liked in the 70s. That's when I had to admit to myself that, yeah, deep down... I was a girl.

Yeah. I grew up playing Bach minuets and protestant hymns on piano. I loathed pop-culture music till I was 15. Then I started listening to Guns N' Roses, etc. Just a few years later, (age 20), at the same time that I started smoking weed, I was introduced to late 60s music. That's when I fell fanatically in love with the Beatles. It was all me and my friends listened to. It took a couple years more for me to begin fully realizing how insanely good The Stones were . . . And Stevie Wonder and Van Morrison. But when I was 23, "Bringing It All Back Home" stumbled into my truck CD player. I might've listened to "It's Alright Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)" a couple thousand times. At that point, I realized, like Lennon, that infinite importance of lyrics.

Late twenties, I found Townes Van Zandt . . . (Specifically "Live At The Old Quarter.") It had a similar effect. I actually left Little Rock Arkansas and drove to Austin to see the Old Quarter. It was a mecca, of sorts; that's how much I liked the album. (Bear in mind, I'd heard his studio stuff and certainly wasn't blown away). SXSW was about to start, and I kind of looked down on the whole culture, to a degree anyway . . . especially b/c they - no one - could f'n even tell me where the Old Quarter was. I thought they were fuckin' idiots since they didn't know that one of the best folk albums ever had been recorded in a venue in their town. Me and my friend drove back to Little Rock and I shortly found out the The Old Quarter is in Galveston, not Austin. Joke's on me, you know. That was around 2004; a time when people were yet to google everything and anything before doing something. One couldn't make that mistake now, of course.

I'm definitely glad we're still friends, Ian, but so help me God, if you murmur a word about Dylan in response to this, the whole deal's off! ;)
 
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