Terje Simonsen, The Future of Parapsychology |496|

#2
I enjoyed that discussion, and I do hope very much that Terje joins us here for a bit to discuss the paranormal.

He began discussing the question of telepathy/paranormal abilities in animals. I'd love to have heard a lot more about that because it is something that is clearly important. I have read suggestions that animals kept as pets grow spiritually from that experience so that they can appear again in the afterlife or in NDE's. I certainly don't think the mysteries of consciousness are limited to humans.

While the joke about parapsychology - that everyone at the conference was an atheist - was amusing, I think it missed the point slightly. I used to think of myself as an atheist, long after I got into this stuff because I felt that if you don't believe (in the religious sense) in a god, then you are an atheist. I avoid describing myself that way here because it doesn't correspond to common usage here. So in short, I suspect those conference attendees maybe felt the same way.

Nevertheless, I certainly share the sense that parapsychology has become something of a dried-out husk!

David
 
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#3
Lets let the guest talk about their book or subject and their experiences and not go off the reservation talking about things that don't pertain to the subject matter.
 
#4
I enjoyed that discussion, and I do hope very much that Terje joins us here for a bit to discuss the paranormal.

He began discussing the question of telepathy/paranormal abilities in animals. I'd love to have heard a lot more about that because it is something that is clearly important. I have read suggestions that animals kept as pets grow spiritually from that experience so that they can appear again in the afterlife or in NDE's. I certainly don't think the mysteries of consciousness are limited to humans.

While the joke about parapsychology - that everyone at the conference was an atheist - was amusing, I think it missed the point slightly. I used to think of myself as an atheist, long after I got into this stuff because I felt that if you don't believe (in the religious sense) in a god, then you are an atheist. I avoid describing myself that way here because it doesn't correspond to common usage here. So in short, I suspect those conference attendees maybe felt the same way.

Nevertheless, I certainly share the sense that parapsychology has become something of a dried-out husk!

David
The future of parapsychology is, I hope, helping people to realize what human potential really means. David Moorjani said in an interview w/ his wife, Anita Moorjani, that so-called paranormal is in reality just normal. Practically everyone I've gotten to know pretty well or at least those comfortable in my company have almost always gotten around to relating one or more 'paranormal' experiences, often as a result of my bringing up the subject. It's like NDEs, once a taboo way to get sent to the looney bin or ruin your career as an MD, now growing numbers are fine w/ the phrase 'in another life' & don't turn white when you ask if they've ever had an OBE. Strangely enough, there are now two states that have passed measures to allow 'human composting' instead of embalming or cremation. The Rapture appears to be losing ground as an event for which to be prepared!
 
#5
I absolutely loved this interview and ordered Terje's book right away on audible. He reminds me a bit of Al Borealis. His sense of humor is fantastic: as subtle as an earthquake; - you can't really tell when it is going to hit, but when it does, you certainly know it is there. Also, his insight is as broad as it is sweeping. Such a better read than Huxley! I tried to listen to "A Brave New World," and Terje's book was a refreshing substitute! By comparison, Huxley was like a nagging broad sweeping.
 
#6
I enjoyed that discussion, and I do hope very much that Terje joins us here for a bit to discuss the paranormal.

He began discussing the question of telepathy/paranormal abilities in animals. I'd love to have heard a lot more about that because it is something that is clearly important. I have read suggestions that animals kept as pets grow spiritually from that experience so that they can appear again in the afterlife or in NDE's. I certainly don't think the mysteries of consciousness are limited to humans.

While the joke about parapsychology - that everyone at the conference was an atheist - was amusing, I think it missed the point slightly. I used to think of myself as an atheist, long after I got into this stuff because I felt that if you don't believe (in the religious sense) in a god, then you are an atheist. I avoid describing myself that way here because it doesn't correspond to common usage here. So in short, I suspect those conference attendees maybe felt the same way.

Nevertheless, I certainly share the sense that parapsychology has become something of a dried-out husk!

David
Absolutely telepathy/paranormal abilities exist in animals, and I am happy that you have hi-lighted this point of the interview. I have lived with snakes for over 30 years, and I am 100% sure that they have the ability to communicate telepathically. Furthermore, I know they have the ability to enter into my dreams. Snakes are very unique creatures. Maybe that is why they got hit so hard with religious smear campaigns that label them as evil.
 
#7
Absolutely telepathy/paranormal abilities exist in animals, and I am happy that you have hi-lighted this point of the interview. I have lived with snakes for over 30 years, and I am 100% sure that they have the ability to communicate telepathically. Furthermore, I know they have the ability to enter into my dreams. Snakes are very unique creatures. Maybe that is why they got hit so hard with religious smear campaigns that label them as evil.
Do you keep them as pets - with names? Tell us more about this!

David
 
#8
Do you keep them as pets - with names? Tell us more about this!

David
Yes, I do keep them as pets with names. Thanks for asking, I am quite passionate about these phenomenal creatures. The fascination began with me as a young kid of about 10 years. The neighbor, across the court, brought over a garter snake. Immediately I was mystified by this creature. I couldn't even think of it as an animal. From the flicking of the forked tongue to the limbless, yet graceful and highly decorated body. The skin felt smoother than silk, and the snake wasn't aggressive at all. I remember thinking to myself, intently, "How is this thing able to move without legs or arms?"

Nevertheless, my mother did not feel the same way as I did! She went absolutely ape shit about the snake being brought over to the house. Questions about: was it poisonous? Did it bite me? How could I associate with such evil?- etc. You see, I grew up in a very Christian family. In fact, our family was so incredibly Christian that we were not allowed to celebrate, let alone attend school, on Halloween. We were so ridiculously Christian that we had to attend Church EVERY Sunday. I can understand her perspective, as she was the mother of five children, I being the second eldest. My mother was and is a good mother, despite the fact that she accidentally gave birth to the demon that is me. :)

I would say this esoteric appreciation of my deviation from Christianity, by my mother, began when I was 7nth grade. I wasn't the kind of kid that easily fit in, at home or at school. Regardless, even if you are a weirdo, you develop the understanding for competition as the means of survival when you are in a family the size of mine. So there I was, competitively giving my all on the field of an "Ultimate Frisbee" match during physical education in the 7nth grade. I could clearly see it in front of me, running for it, was about to catch it, then SLAM!!!!!

I blasted this poor girl to oblivion, but at the same time I felt as though I was hit by a nuclear bomb. I did not mean to run into her, as my eye was on the Frisbee, but I couldn't move my arm and was in incredible pain. My good Christian mother was called to the school, drove me to the doctor, and discovered that I had fractured my collarbone.

After the bad news at the doctors office, and the odd brace that I was fitted with, my mother took me to the pet shop. She bought what was called a "ribbon snake" for me. That is similar to a garter snake, but slightly slimmer. Though the pain was nearly intolerable in my arm and below my neck.....this still became one of he happiest days in my life! I never thought my mother would do this for me because she was so afraid of snakes!

Naturally, I was enamored with this creature. I fed it minnows and/or small goldfish. I was fascinated by how it swallowed its food whole, as well as how its head and body stretched like a sock to fit its food. One day, he had disappeared from his cage!!!!! I couldn't find him anywhere in my room. I was so sad! At the time, being the good Christian kid that I wanted to be, I sat down on the bed and asked God, "God, please show me where my pet is. PLEASE!"

Immediately, God replied without speaking, "Under the lamp on your desk."

I went to that lamp with the white, round base, and the strange metal framework that made it look like a crane to me. I picked it up....and there was my ribbon snake!!!!!

This was only the beginning of the reality that I was indelibly attached to these creatures.
 
#9
Lets let the guest talk about their book or subject and their experiences and not go off the reservation talking about things that don't pertain to the subject matter.
Welcome to Skeptiko. This podcast isn't an advertisement, it's a discussion between Alex and the guest about things that interest Alex.
 
#10
I bought Terje's book, and at first I thought that was a mistake because it seemed a bit light-weight, but then I realised it contains a wealth of evidence for psychic phenomena, including areas I knew nothing about - for example, it would seem that quite a lot of archaeological digs are informed by psychics. He also describes how Freud was an honorary member of the British Society for Psychical Research as well as its US counterpart, and looked favourably on the idea of telephapthy.

He uses an analogy between the psychic interactions between humans and the internet. It does seem to be a very good analogy, and it makes me wonder if a vague awareness of this interconnection drove people to invent the internet.

There is definitely a lot to think about in this book.

David
 
#11
Welcome to Skeptiko. This podcast isn't an advertisement, it's a discussion between Alex and the guest about things that interest Alex.
I see that!!! I mean I like Alex and his views on a lot of things, but its the same stupid bullshit about trying to prove ether Jesus is fake, whatever the fuck Evil is real means, or the the science community as a hole vs. our guys ! I mean I got it but its the same fake bullshit argument in every podcast lol its a joke! I thought he was more intelligent then that as a interviewer.
 
#12
I absolutely loved this interview and ordered Terje's book right away on audible. He reminds me a bit of Al Borealis. His sense of humor is fantastic: as subtle as an earthquake; - you can't really tell when it is going to hit, but when it does, you certainly know it is there. Also, his insight is as broad as it is sweeping. Such a better read than Huxley! I tried to listen to "A Brave New World," and Terje's book was a refreshing substitute! By comparison, Huxley was like a nagging broad sweeping.
They talked very little about the book. Another waste bullshit interview
 
#13
They talked very little about the book. Another waste bullshit interview
This wasn't a bullshit interview. Go read the book, man! Are you just being a douche bag? These discussions are always on a fresh perspective regarding both, spirituality and science. Also, if you don't like this forum or Alex's work, why are you participating in it? Get on Tictok or some other shit disturbing bullshit.
 
#14
I had to touch back to this Skeptiko episode. I just finished listening to all of Terje's book. It really is fucking incredible! I left a five star review on audible and referenced everybody to come check out Skeptiko. That book is a work of art, and I wouldn't have found it without Skeptiko.
 

Alex

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#15
I had to touch back to this Skeptiko episode. I just finished listening to all of Terje's book. It really is fucking incredible! I left a five star review on audible and referenced everybody to come check out Skeptiko. That book is a work of art, and I wouldn't have found it without Skeptiko.
nice... yeah, Terje is a smart guy!
 
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